Disenfranchisement of the College Student

If you ever wanted to know how NH encourages out-of-state student voters to claim “residency” in NH in the never ending effort to steal your vote I have offered interested readers a paper written back in 1982 that pretty much sums it up.

Every Federal case regarding transient student voters is annotated in this Fordham University paper. It is quite balanced except it does not mention the stolen votes of the domiciled inhabitants of the states where unconstitutional student voting is allowed. That is a separate subject we cover at The Coalition of NH Taxpayers.

Here is the site:

http://ir.lawnet.fordham.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1203&context=ulj

You might notice it looks like a long paper but it is mostly annotations one of which is Newberger v. Peterson, the 1972 case regarding “intent” to stay a NH domiciled voter after swearing that you are when registering.

The famous case previous to Newberger is one out of Tennessee in which that state’s laws requiring draconian residency requirements was struck down in Federal court. This is what led to student voting activists picking NH as the next target regarding “intent” to stay.

Naturally this type of litigation to win NH elections with student voters spurred Judge Lewis to declare students “mobile domicliaries” who could steal a vote in NH and remain the legal residents of other states. That case is hung in limbo because of inaction by our higher court and will remain there as long as the activist who promote illegal voting think they can get away with it.

Here is a paragraph from this paper that exposes that idea:

COMMENTS

DISENFRANCHISEMENT OF THE COLLEGE

STUDENT VOTE: WHEN A RESIDENT IS NOT A

RESIDENT

I. Introduction

The standards used by state and local election officials to determine whether students may vote as residents' of the communities in which they attend college vary significantly among the fifty states. 2 Common law domicile principles 3, which determine residency for voting purposes, 4 often have been distorted when applied to students so that a state or its subdivision can effectuate its policy of encouraging or discouraging student voting at college. 5

I underlined exactly what the New Hampshire problem is: a policy of encouraging non-resident voters to effectuate, in this case political agenda.

Should readers take the few minutes to read the background of election law regarding student voters and domicile, the important word used in the NH State Constitution they will find out what a fraud has been perpetrated against NH voters by our courts, Attorney General’s Office – Elections Division and Secretary of State who sits on his hands.