NH Rep Max Abramson - New Hampshire's Dumbest Law

When we reuse or recycle old milk jugs to water our plants, we rarely think that we may find ourselves facing criminal charges and one year in corrections for each offense.  It's unlikely that this would actually happen, yet there are still many old laws on the books that were never repealed as technology, society, and our economy has changed.  Enacted in 1907, the legislature made only one modification in 1961, changing this to a misdemeanor.
 
Perusing the Revised Statutes Annotated at your local library or online, we find that it is illegal to hunt with ferrets or destroy a muskrat house.  It is perfectly lawful to collect seaweed in all 50 states, but in New Hampshire, you cannot do so at night.  If your GPS gives you a notice on the highway, you must now pull over to hit OK under the new hands free driving law.  StupidLaws.com warns of a $150 fine for ”maintaining the national forest without a permit.” DumbLaws.com (no relation) warns of RSA 353:10, which makes it a crime to check into a motel or inn under an assumed name.
 
While some of these laws may have made sense long ago, some are leaving more confusion and questions than answers.  School age kids from around the state are being invited to find the silliest, most outdated, nonsensical laws that they can find.  Interested students can get on the Internet and start putting words into the search field at:
 
gencourt.state.nh.us/rsa/html/indexes/search.html
 
They can then find the RSA number and post your suggestion to the Facebook page, New Hampshire's Dumbest Law before the September 15th deadline.  Students can also mail their suggestion to New Hampshire's Dumbest Law, PO Box 746, Seabrook, N.H. 03874.  A number of legislators will select from those suggestions and file a bill to repeal that law.  The winning class will get to come to the State House and argue before a House Committee to repeal this law and learn the legislative process in person.  This is a great learning experience for students, and should be a good chance for youngsters to affect the laws of our state.
 
Rep. Max Abramson
Rockingham 20