NHWatchdog - Health Care, Roads, and Fish Pedicures

Watchdog Today: Health Care, Roads, and Fish Pedicures

Three Voluntary Healthcare Changes


Today at New Hampshire Watchdog, Charlie Arlinghaus outlines three voluntary steps New Hampshire could take to improve health care, without new taxes and mandates.

As Washington debates mandates and regulations and deciding who to punish in health care, there are a few things that we can do at a state level that don’t force anyone to do anything but might actually help.

For decades, most of the health care debate has been about limits and regulations. Government acts as if it can only save money if they take it from someone else and keep a tight regulatory clampdown. The new federal bill for example will probably cost a lot of jobs but will create 16,500 new IRS agents. They’re here to help, I’m sure.

Instead of new bureaucracies to police you or a new state agency to dictate hospital prices, there are three things we can do that are not ideologically charged and impose no limits or requirements on anyone’s activities. They’re voluntary choices that you can make or choose not to make.


READ CHARLIE'S COLUMN

House Approves Unbalanced Transportation Plan


The New Hampshire House has overwhelmingly approved a Ten Year Plan for transportation spending that assumes a $673 million deficit.  How will New Hampshire taxpayers pay for the Legislature's inability to set priorities.

The New Hampshire House has overwhelmingly approved a ten year plan for transportation projects that spends $673 million more than its raises over the next decade. The chamber approved HB 2010 by a vote of 317-11 with little debate, as Public Works and Highways Committee Vice-Chair David Campbell was the only member to address the bill. No one spoke in opposition.

The Legislature updates its list of transportation priorities every two years. The latest draft includes $3.6 billion in projects, but only $2.9 billion in revenues. Campbell says that part of the shortfall could be overcome by extending the temporary surcharge on vehicle registrations set to expire next year. He estimated that extending the fee would bring in an additional $15 per year for nine years. Campbell advocates a $.15 per gallon gas tax to pay for road construction. HB 2010 is a planning document, and does not raise any taxes itself.

READ OUR CONTINUING COVERAGE OF THE TEN YEAR PLAN AT NH WATCHDOG


New Hampshire Nannies

Is the Live Free for Die State becoming the Nanny State?  Reason TV asks why we're banning people from getting pedicures from fish.

WATCH REASON TV'S VIDEO REPORT


How is the economy affecting you?

We're happy to support New Hampshire Public Radio's Working It Out program.  Share how your economic security has been affected by the recession, and read stories from your New Hampshire neighbors.

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New Hampshire Watchog on WGIR

Stay up to date on New Hampshire's budget crisis everyday at New Hampshire Watchdog.  And listen for NH Watchdog on WGIR every Friday morning at 7:40am on the Charlie Sherman Show on AM610 WGIR.