NRN - The Daily Wrap-Up 7/13/10

July 13, 2010
6:00 PM Eastern


Good Tuesday Evening -

A tale of two Kagan's. Before the Supreme Court, Solicitor General Elena Kagan, on behalf of the Obama Administration, in the recent Citizens United decision that lifted restrictions on independent expenditures on electioneering political speech, argued that political pamphleteering and political movies were not covered by the First Amendment, but that political books were.

Berwick: A stealth recess appointment. For those serving as President, making a recess appointment when Congress is not in session is a right guaranteed by the Constitution – Article II, Section 2, to be exact. In the era of our nation's founding, participating in Congress was far from a full-time duty and sometimes months would pass without a single session, making the executive's initiative to maintain continuity in certain posts important.

SEIU's new president should be asked about liabilities, Change to Win coalition.  "Visionary, but divisive." That's how The New York Times describes Andy Stern, the Service Employee International Union's (SEIU) former president, in this profile piece about his successor Mary Kay Henry. She is ambitious to make her own mark in terms of organizing and politicking, according to the report. But Ms. Henry is also working to cut a distinct path and to reunite labor organizations that became split under Stern.

Conflicts of interest continue at FDA's TPSAC. As we have noted here before, there is a serious issue dealing with conflicts of interest at the FDA's Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee (TPSAC). This committee advises the FDA on regulations for tobacco products. However, several members of the committee are not independent, thus, regulations that are passed down affect the financial interests of those on the committee.

Snowe, Collins and Brown draw fire over support of Financial Takeover Bill. New England Republican Senators Olympia Snowe, Susan Collins, and Scott Brown have indicated they will be voting for the Dodd-Frank financial takeover bill, prompting criticism from Americans for Limited Government President Bill Wilson.