CEI Weekly: Congress Should Start Quantifying Federal Regulation

Friday, October 7, 2011

 

 

Feature: CEI Vice President for Policy Wayne Crews outlines ways for Congress to keep regulations in check.

FEATURED STORY: Congress Should Start Quantifying Federal Regulation

 

CEI has released a new Issue Analysis by Vice President for Policy Wayne Crews: "The Other National Debt Crisis: How and Why Congress Must Quantify Federal Regulation." Crews argues that the federal government must start holding itself truly accountable for the costs it is forcing on struggling American businesses if the nation is to pull itself out of its current economic slump. Read the full Issue Analysis here.

 

 

SHAPING THE DEBATE

 

Free Trade Without Apology

Fran Smith and Nick DeLong's CEI OnPoint

CEI Onpoint

 

Why Your Bank is Charging New Fees

John Berlau's op-ed in National Review

 

Rising China: The Seen and the Unseen

Bill Frezza's op-ed on RealClearMarkets

 

Time Out for Federal Regulation

Wayne Crews' column in Forbes

 

Nobel Prize for Physics

Ryan Young's op-ed in The Daily Caller

 

Stimulus Slows Our Economy

Iain Murray and Dave Bier's op-ed in The Washington Times

 

Clean Air's Dirty Residue

Iain Murray's op-ed in The American Spectator

 

Book Review: Force of Nature

Angela Logomasini's book review in The Washington Times

 

Today's Red Tape Would Have Killed Home Depot's IPO

John Berlau's letter to the editor in The Wall Street Journal

 

Capital Gains Tax Far Too High

Hans Bader's letter to the editor in The Washington Times

 

                     

 

 

    CEI PODCAST

 

October 6, 2011: How to Deregulate the Economy

 

Vice President for Policy Wayne Crews is author of the new CEI study, “The Other National Debt Crisis: How and Why Congress Must Quantify Regulation.” He discusses a few of his many ideas for deregulating the economy, including a regulatory budget, improved cost analysis, and lowering the threshold of “economically significant” regulations from $100 million to $25 million. This would require OMB to review more than the roughly 5 percent of new rules that it currently analyzes. The other 95 percent should not slip through the cracks.