CEI Weekly: What's Wrong With the Stop Online Piracy Act?

Friday, January 20, 2012

 

 

 

Feature: On Wednesday, hundreds of websites protested controversial legislation aimed at curbing Internet piracy.

FEATURE: What's Wrong With the Stop Online Piracy Act?

 

If you used the Internet this past Wednesday, you know about the widespread web protest against the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and the Protect IP Act (PIPA). CEI has long stood in opposition to these anti-piracy bills, which, while well-intentioned, would harm security, innovation, and freedom on the Internet. On Thursday, CEI Associate Director of Technology Studies Ryan Radia moderated a panel discussion on the bills' flaws. Radia also appeared on ABC 7 News to discuss SOPA. Watch his interview here.

 

SHAPING THE DEBATE

 

The Report on Carcinogens

Richard B. Belzer' Issue Analysis

 

Obama Channels Cheney

Iain Murray and David Bier's op-ed in The Sacramento Bee & The Miami Herald

 

The Ability to Fire People Creates More and Better Jobs

William Frezza's column in Forbes

 

Columnist Wants Consumer Bureau to Be Big Brother

John Berlau's op-ed in The American Spectator

 

Wisconsin Union Holding Federal Funds Hostage

Trey Kovacs' op-ed in The Washington Examiner

 

"Climate" and the Campaign

Chris Horner's post in The American Spectator Blogs

 

Law Schools Taking More and More Criticism

Hans Bader's citation in National Review

 

Obama is Ignoring His Own Jobs Council's Recommendations

Wayne Crews' citation in The Daily Caller

 

A Tale of Two Energy Policies

Matt Patterson's citation in The Pelican Post

 

                     

 

 

CEI PODCAST

 

January 18, 2012 -- Dropping the SOPA

 

Wikipedia, Reddit, and other popular websites all went black today to protest SOPA and PIPA, two bills currently before Congress. Critics charge that the bills could potentially shut down the Internet as we know it. Associate Director of Technology Studies Ryan Radia explains how the bills would work, and how they would indeed stifle free speech.