RNC - Poll: Romney leads Obama in Maine congressional district

Just before the Vice Presidential debate kicks off, a new poll from New Hampshire’s neighboring state has Romney leading in Maine’s second Congressional district—and the state splits its electoral votes.

Recent polling out of New Hampshire shows that Granite Staters are increasingly turning to the Romney/Ryan ticket. Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan have a clear plan to strengthen the middle-class which would create 12 million new jobs and generate higher take-home pay.

This follows numerous national polls that show Governor Romney pulling in to the lead.


Poll: Romney leads Obama in Maine congressional district


Byron Tau

October 11, 2012


According to a new poll shared exclusively with POLITICO, Mitt Romney is leading President Obama in a congressional district in Maine — raising the possibility of the GOP nominee winning an electoral vote in a deep blue state.

The live-call poll, conducted by Glen Bolger of NMB Research and provided to POLITICO by American Crossroads communications director Jonathan Collegio, shows Obama winning statewide 48 percent to 44 percent.

That result already puts Romney in a surprisingly competitive position in a nominally blue state.

But in Maine's second congressional district, Romney actually tops Obama 49 percent to 44 percent — a result outside the margin of error.

In most states, that such a result wouldn't mean much. But Maine is one of two states in the country that splits its electoral college vote by congressional district.

The second congressional district, encompassing the northern and western part of the state, is largely rural and overwhelmingly white — groups that Obama has never done well among.

During redistricting, the Republican legislature also shifted two towns — Waterville and Winslow — that went heavily for Obama in 2008 from the second congressional district into the first — giving the GOP ticket a boost by removing two population centers from the district.

The idea of a state splitting its electoral vote is not farfetched either.

Obama famously won a single electoral vote in Nebraska's second congressional district — encompassing Omaha and its suburbs.

The poll points to the surprising possibility of a similar situation in Maine — a state that has not voted for a Republican at the presidential level since 1988.

The poll surveyed 500 likely voters, polled October 7-8 — giving the poll a margin of error of about plus or minus 4 percent.