CEI Today: Collective bargaining case in court, Solyndra audit, and EPA fracking fail

COURT RULES ON LABOR UNION CASE  - IAIN MURRAY AND F. VINCENT VERNUCCIO

WashingtonExaminer.com: Walker's reforms stand up in court, on balance sheets

U.S. District Court for the Western District of Wisconsin Judge William Conley ruled that [Wisconsin] could limit collective bargaining for government employees and protect the workers' right to not pay union dues while still keeping their jobs. However, he also ruled that the state could not require unions to be recertified every year or prohibit dues deductions from government paychecks.

The key point was not the merits of Act 10 but the fact that they were not universally applied. The court ruled that the recertification and dues deduction provisions violated the First Amendment and Equal Protection Clause of the Constitution because they exempted public safety unions. They might have been ruled constitutional were they applied to all union members. > Read the full story on WashingtonExaminer.com


> Interview Iain Murray or Vincent Vernuccio

> Keep up with labor union news at Workplacechoice.org

 

SOLYNDRA AUDIT - MARLO LEWIS

Globalwarming.org:
Treasury OIG: Watchdog Pussyfoots Around Solyndra Debacle


Last week, the Treasury Department’s Office of Inspector General (OIG) released an audit report on Treasury’s role in reviewing, in March 2009, the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) $535 million loan guarantee to Solyndra, the solar panel manufacturer that filed for bankruptcy in September 2011. Before going belly up, Solyndra burned through $528 million of the $535 million it received from Treasury’s Federal Financing Bank (FFB). Nearly all of the defaulted loan will be paid off by American taxpayers. > Read more at Globalwarming.org

>Interview Marlo Lewis

 

EPA OVER-REACH - WILLIAM YEATMAN

Globalwarming.org:
EPA Sweeps Another Fracking Fail under the Rug

 

The EPA recently informed Range Resources that it was dropping its order to a Fort Worth, Texas-based natural gas company to provide drinking water to residents in Parker County.  In its original order, EPA claimed tests had concluded that hydraulic fracturing (a.k.a. “fracking”) operations by the company “caused or contributed to the contamination of at least two residential drinking water wells.”. Although EPA’s subsequent letter to the company did not identify why the Agency was abandoning its case, it would appear that the move is a vindication of the conclusions drawn by the Railroad Commission.


This is the second time in three weeks that EPA has suffered egg on its face for an overreach on fracking regulation. > Read the full commentary on Globalwarming.org


> Interview William Yeatman