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Tuesday
Jan152013

CEI Today: EPA deadline today for FOIA, the warmest year in US history?, and the future of copyright law 

WARMEST YEAR IN US HISTORY? - ANTHONY WARD

Globalwarming.org
:
Alarmists Inconsistent On Importance of U.S. Temperature Record

 

Global warming alarmists have seized upon an announcement by NOAA this week that 2012 was the warmest year in the U. S. historical record going back to 1895.

According to the NOAA
report released on January 8, the average annual temperature for the contiguous U.S. was 55.3F.  This is an increase of 3.3F above the 20th century average, and makes 2012 the warmest year on record.

[But] according to the global satellite
temperature record maintained by John Christy and Roy Spencer at the University of Alabama at Huntsville, 2012 was the ninth warmest year globally since 1979.  > Read the commentary on Globalwarming.org


> Interview Anthony Ward

 

EPA EMAIL SCANDAL, CEI FOIA REQUEST - CHRISTOPHER HORNER

Monday is D-Day -- Delivery Day -- for Richard Windsor's Emails.

On Monday, per its agreement as filed with the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia in CEI v. EPA, the Environmental Protection Agency and/or its lawyers the Department of Justice are to produce the first of four deliveries of approximately 3,000 emails to or from the Administrator formerly known as "Richard Windsor".

Specifically, EPA owes CEI a cache of identified emails to or from EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson (by pure coincidence, that’s now "outgoing Administrator Jackson”...), using one or more of four keywords: coal, climate, endanger/endangerment and/or MACT ("war on coal" emails).

> Interview Christopher Horner

FUTURE OF COPYRIGHT - RYAN RADIA

Cato Unbound: A Balanced Approach to Copyright


With Congress taking a breather from copyright after last year’s bruising SOPA battle, now is an opportune time to take a step back and consider what the proper governmental role in the market for creative expressions should be.

To be sure, critics of copyright are right that the Copyright Act abounds with flaws and excesses. But defenders of copyright correctly argue that its core goals are fundamentally sound—and will likely remain so for the foreseeable future. Policymakers should seriously consider the suggestions of thoughtful free market copyright reformers ... but they should think twice before writing off copyright as yet another incarnation of big government excess. > View the full commentary at Cato Unbound

> Inteview Ryan Radia

 

 

CEI is a non-profit, non-partisan public policy group dedicated to the principles of free enterprise and limited government.  For more information about CEI, please visit our website, cei.org, and blogs, Globalwarming.org and OpenMarket.org.  Follow CEI on Twitter! Twitter.com/ceidotorg.

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