NHDP - Flashback: Bradley Casts New England's Lone Yes Vote Banning Marriage Equality

Concord - In case you missed it, or have forgotten, as a member of Congress Jeb Bradley was the only Representative from New England to vote for a constitutional ban on marriage equality.  "However, because court rulings have threatened the legitimacy of DOMA by allowing same-sex marriages, I believe we should protect traditional marriage by ensuring that marriage is defined as between one man and one woman," said Bradley defending his discriminatory vote.

"As a member of  Congress Jeb Bradley represented the far right instead of New Hampshire's traditional values of fairness and equality.  Nearly seven years later and after being rejected by New Hampshire voters twice, nothing has changed.  Now a state Senator Bradley is still representing the far right wing and still opposing equality for thousands of loving New Hampshire families," said New Hampshire Democratic Party Communications Director Harrell Kirstein. 

In Concord, Bradley voted against New Hampshire's historic marriage equality law, continuing to oppose equal rights for Granite State LGBT families. [HB436 Roll Call]  Numerous public opinion polls show that the majority of Granite Staters and Americans support marriage equality. [UNH Survey Center; Washington Post, 3/2013]

"Jeb Bradley is so far to the right he is out of touch not just with the majority of New Hampshire voters, but even with many members of his own party nationally who now support marriage equality for all," added Kirstein.

 
Associated Press: Bradley Casts New England's Lone Yes Vote on Gay Marriage Measure
July 19, 2006
LENGTH: 171 words
DATELINE: WASHINGTON 
Republican U.S. Rep. Jeb Bradley of New Hampshire was the only New Englander to vote for a constitutional amendment to ban gay marriage Tuesday.

The House rejected the proposed amendment by a vote of 236-187 with one member voting "present," 47 short of the two-thirds majority needed to advance the proposal.

Rep. Charles Bass, R-N.H., voted against the measure, as did the House members from Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Maine and Vermont.

Bradley echoed other supporters who argued that Congress must step in to stop judges who have ruled in favor of gay marriages.

"I support the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), signed into law by President Clinton in 1996, which was intended to ensure that same-sex marriages would not be recognized under federal law," Bradley said in a statement.

"However, because court rulings have threatened the legitimacy of DOMA by allowing same-sex marriages, I believe we should protect traditional marriage by ensuring that marriage is defined as between one man and one woman," he said.