« CEI Today: Farm Bill, Egypt democracy vs liberty, and the Apple anti-trust case | Main | CEI Weekly: New Study on EPA Incompetence »
Friday
Jul122013

Josiah Bartlett Center - The Budget, Federalism, Medicaid, and Unemployment

Weekly Update from the
Josiah Bartlett Center


Keeping you up to date on our latest research
on the issues impacting New Hampshire


The state budget has come and partially gone. We’re left with the victory claims and some of the unfinished business that promises to drag through the rest of the year. Don’t believe everything you read: the budget is something no one loves or hates and includes two time bombs that will emerge in six months like a plague of locusts to consume all political vegetation.

New Hampshire’s budget process was difficult this year because we have little experience with government quite so divided as this one was. The House and Senate are controlled by different parties and had very different budget ideas. Past experiences with divided government included overwhelming legislative majorities that ignored the governor or working coalitions of ideological compatibility... Click here to keep reading.

###

The 50 Biggest Winners at the Supreme Court

Federalism gets a big boost

The nine justices of the U.S. Supreme Court all agreed on one thing this week: states matter. In a pair of high-profile cases, the court’s liberal and conservative wings each joined with swing voter Anthony Kennedy to reach decisions that greatly reduced the power of the federal government to contradict state decisions... Click here to keep reading

###

Medicaid Expansion

JBC President named to Study Commission

Center President Charlie Arlinghaus was recently named to serve on the Medicaid Expansion Study Commission, while Grant Bosse has some questions they should ponder.... Click here to keep reading.

###

National Unemployment Holds at 7.6%


Mixed Data in the National jobs report

The June unemployment rate remained unchanged at 7.6%. While the ranks of the unemployed grew by 17,000, the increase was not large enough to change the rate. The number of those not in the workforce grew by 12,000, but those classified as wanting a job fell by 132,000.... Click here to keep reading.

PrintView Printer Friendly Version

EmailEmail Article to Friend