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Monday
Apr142014

NHDP - NEW VIDEO: Web Video Lays Out Major Issues Surrounding Walt Havenstein

Maryland Multimillionaire Either is Ineligible to Run or Committed Tax Fraud

 

Concord, NH-- Walt Havenstein, Washington Republicans' hand-picked candidate for Governor, plans to formally announce his candidacy this week, without having addressed the residency and tax issues surrounding the Maryland multimillionaire. The NHDP's new web video lays out for New Hampshire voters the fundamental problems with Havenstein's candidacy.

"Granite Staters don’t know much about Walt Havenstein or what he stands for, but this web video highlights what we do know: either he is ineligible to run for Governor in New Hampshire or committed tax fraud in Maryland," said New Hampshire Democratic Party Chairman Ray Buckley. "Havenstein's campaign hasn't even left the gate, yet the hand-picked candidate of Washington Republicans has already shown that he is willing to break the rules to be elected Governor.

"Granite Staters trust and support Governor Hassan because she is a strong, bipartisan leader who is focused on solving problems in order to strengthen our middle class and move our economy forward," continued Buckley. "Walt Havenstein, on the other hand, has only been able to demonstrate that he believes the rules don't apply to him, and the people of New Hampshire can't trust him to stand up for our priorities," concluded Buckley.

Click here to watch the new web video and see below for the transcript.
 
 
Transcript:
 
News clip
 
Maryland multimillionaire Walt Havenstein wants to be Governor of New Hampshire…
 
But why New Hampshire?
 
News clip
 
Havenstein’s primary residence was in Maryland as recently as 2012…
 
And even though he says he "can't recall" signing the application, he took a tax break worth thousands of dollars that is only available to Maryland residents…
 
He really likes Maryland small businesses
 
Speech clip
 
And the state of Maryland in general
 
Interview clip
 
He may not even be eligible to be governor here, New Hampshire requires Governors to be residents for 7 years
 
Now he wants us to think he's been a New Hampshire resident the whole time…
 
But if he lived in New Hampshire, he misled Maryland on taxes…
 
So which is it – Ineligible to run or tax fraud?
 
Havenstein can't have it both ways.

 
Background:

Nashua Telegraph expose outlined how Walt Havenstein took Maryland property tax breaks that required his principal residence to be in that state, raising a host of questions and placing his candidacy in doubt.

The Telegraph uncovered that Havenstein “saved $5,354 from 2008-11 by getting a homestead exemption from local property taxes in Bethesda, Md. He also paid a lower state property transfer tax while buying the property in that state. To get both, Havenstein had to acknowledge that his $1 million condominium was his ‘principal residence' where he was living at least seven months of the year." [Nashua Telegraph3/23/14]
 
Under Maryland law, ”Principal residence” has been defined to mean the “one dwelling where the homeowner regularly resides and is the location designated by the owner for the legal purposes of voting, obtaining a driver’s license, and filing income tax returns.” [MAPM, accessed 4/2/14]
 
Maryland law was enacted in 2007 that requires all homeowners to submit an application stating that they meet the principal residence requirements, under penalty of perjury. According to the Telegraph, “Havenstein said he didn’t recall signing that form.” [State of Maryland, accessed 4/2/2014Nashua Telegraph3/23/14]
 
A few weekends ago, a Nashua Telegraph report emphasized Havenstein's problems stating that he was either "ineligible to run for the office or committed tax fraud in Maryland." [Nashua Telegraph3/31/14]

That same report found that in addition to registering a car in Maryland, Havenstein briefly held a driver’s license in that state. New Hampshire doesn’t allow someone to hold a valid driver’s license in this state while having an active license in another state. [Nashua Telegraph3/31/14, State of New Hampshire, accessed 4/2/14]

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