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Friday
Aug082014

NHDP - Brown’s Reckless Attacks Backfire When He Condemns A Policy He Voted for in Massachusetts 

Brown’s Defense: I Was Duped!
 
Meanwhile, Fellow Republicans Turn Against His Divisive Immigration Rhetoric

 

 
Manchester, NH— Scott Brown's desperate immigration attacks are backfiring as he has been caught criticizing a policy he voted for as a Massachusetts State Senator. Brown defended his vote by effectively claiming he was duped into it, suggesting that he never even bothered to read the legislation, which was voted on separately. Meanwhile, members of his own party are turning on his divisive rhetoric with Fergus Cullen, former Chairman of the NHGOP, calling out Scott Brown for using immigration for his own political gain, saying "it’s a cynical play, and I’m disappointed in Brown for using this issue this way."  
 
“Scott Brown’s rhetoric has become so reckless that now he’s even attacking his own record,” said New Hampshire Democratic Party Communications Director Julie McClain. “The people of New Hampshire deserve better than Scott Brown’s ‘cynical plays’ that are solely intended to score him political points. They deserve a Senator like Jeanne Shaheen, who puts New Hampshire first and makes a difference for the state.”
 
Underscoring the cynical nature of Brown’s attacks is the fact that he penned an op-ed this week lambasting in-state tuition for illegal immigrants, all while conveniently ignoring his own record. As a Massachusetts State Senator, Brown voted to allow undocumented students to pay in-state tuition.
 
Brown has already taken aim at New Hampshire’s Republican Senator Kelly Ayotte who, along with Senator Jeanne Shaheen, voted for comprehensive immigration reform and increased border security.
 
When NECN noted Ayotte's support for comprehensive immigration reform, and asked Brown if would have supported it as well, he struggled to answer, muttering weakly, "Yeah, I, I, I, uhh, uhh, hard to say, but probably not." Almost a week later, Brown still couldn’t tell voters how he would’ve voted on the bill when he again hedged, this time in the Washington Times.

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