NHDP - ICYMI: Nashua Telegraph Editorial: “‘Blah, blah, blah’ from the speaker”

Key point: “It was just a year ago that tea-party extremists within Boehner’s own House Republican Caucus hijacked the ship when they refused to raise the debt ceiling, leading to the highly unpopular government shutdown that Boehner was powerless to stop.

“Funny, then, that he should come to New Hampshire and ask voters to send him still more tea-party representatives in the persons of Garcia and Guinta.”

See here or below for the Telegraph editorial:

‘Blah, blah, blah’ from the speaker

John Boehner, the speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, is scheduled to be in the Granite State on Wednesday to stump for Marilinda Garcia in her attempt to unseat Rep. Ann Kuster in New Hampshire’s 2nd Congressional District, and Frank Guinta’s bid to take back the seat in the 1st Congressional District.

The speaker’s office was nice enough to send us an email in advance, stating that “Boehner believes there are five key things we must do as a nation: fix our tax code, solve our spending problem, reform our legal system, rein in our regulatory system, and strengthen education.”

We agree that all of those things warrant attention.

We have harped repeatedly on the tax code issue, but Boehner has been speaker since 2011 and has had ample opportunity to fix the problem during that time. In fact, when the chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee earlier this year put forth a sweeping proposal to rewrite the tax code, Boehner’s response was, “Blah, blah, blah.” Seriously. The man literally said, “Blah, blah, blah.” Hardly sounds like a lawmaker eager to take on the challenges of the day; doesn’t say much about his leadership, either.

Perhaps one of the problems with Rep. Dave Camp’s plan was that it proposed a tax on too-big-to-fail investment banks and the wealthiest Americans in exchange for a top marginal rate of 25 percent for everybody else. Seemed like a reasonable tradeoff, though it apparently fell short of Mr. Boehner’s definition of tax reform, which may be when taxes are lowered for corporations and the super wealthy, while the burden on the rapidly shrinking middle class either becomes heavier or changes not at all.

We suspect it would be a lot easier to take the speaker at his word on the issue of spending, but he’s been in Congress since 1991, when the national debt was about $3 trillion; it’s more than $17 trillion now, and at least some of that increase happened when Boehner was in a position of leadership within his party. Buying his answers about the best way to get the country out of our fiscal quagmire requires first recognizing the fact that he helped lead us here, too. The precise extent to which he has been part of the problem may be debatable, but it seems clear that he hasn’t exactly been part of the national solution, because there haven’t been many of those coming from Congress lately. That’s true not only of fiscal issues, but also on topics like immigration, financial inequality and the legalized bribery that is our campaign finance system, among other things.

You could argue, in fact, that Boehner – along with Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid – is one of the poster children for gridlock in this country. It was just a year ago that tea-party extremists within Boehner’s own House Republican Caucus hijacked the ship when they refused to raise the debt ceiling, leading to the highly unpopular government shutdown that Boehner was powerless to stop.

Funny, then, that he should come to New Hampshire and ask voters to send him still more tea-party representatives in the persons of Garcia and Guinta.