NH DHHS - Diabetes Prevention

DHHS Collaborates to Launch Five More National Diabetes Prevention Program

Sites in New Hampshire

Concord, NH – New Hampshire residents at high risk for type 2 diabetes now

have more resources to prevent the condition. There are seven organizations

in New Hampshire committed to offering the National Diabetes Prevention

Program (NDPP), with five new organizations coming on board in the past few

months. The program helps participants reduce their risk for type 2

diabetes by learning to eat healthier, lose weight, become more physically

active, and manage stress.

The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), Division

of Public Health Services (DPHS) recently hosted a training for 18 new

Lifestyle Coaches who will offer NDPP throughout the State. Additionally,

DPHS, in collaboration with the Community Health Institute and the Diabetes

Prevention Advisory Group, has launched a new website—

www.preventdiabetesnh.org — to link people to programs in their communities.

“Since the risk of type 2 diabetes increases as we get older and New

Hampshire’s population is aging, we can expect that the number of people in

the Granite State with diabetes could increase rapidly in the coming

years,” said Marcella Bobinsky, Acting Director of Public Health at DHHS.

“The NDPP helps individuals with prediabetes prevent or delay the

development of type 2 diabetes. Changing behaviors can be difficult, but

support such as this program provides, can be vital to improving health.”

Prediabetes is defined as having a blood glucose (sugar) level that is

higher than normal but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. A

person with prediabetes is at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes,

which can lead to serious health problems such as heart disease, and


You are more likely to develop prediabetes or type 2 diabetes if you:

· Are 45 years of age or older

· Are Overweight or obese

· Get little or no physical activity

· Have someone in your family that has type 2 diabetes

· Have high blood pressure or take medication for high blood pressure

· Had gestational diabetes or delivered a baby weighing more than 9


· Have an African American, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian, Asian

American, or Pacific Islander racial or ethnic background

In the United States, more than one in three adults have prediabetes.

However, only 11% of those with prediabetes know they have the condition.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention indicates that without

intervention, 15 to 30% of people with prediabetes will develop type 2

diabetes within five years.

For more information and/or to locate a program near you, please visit: