NHDP - Legislature’s Failure to Protect Medicaid Expansion Could Lead to Increased Rates

Legislature’s Failure to Protect Medicaid Expansion Could Lead to Increased Rates for All Granite Staters on the Health Insurance Marketplace
 
Concord, N.H. – After the O’Brien-Jasper House budget removed the Governor’s proposal to continue New Hampshire’s Medicaid expansion plan, the Associated Press highlighted that the longer the legislature waits to act, the greater the effect could be on rates for all Granite Staters on the Health Insurance Marketplace.  
 
Jennifer Patterson of the state’s Insurance Department told the AP, "The decisions that (insurance companies) make and any uncertainties that result from what's going on in the legislative process, all of that gets played out in the rate development, and that is reflected across the entire private market."
 
Lisa Guertin, president of Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield of New Hampshire, told the AP, "It has huge implications on the prices people pay." 
 
“Even if the legislature eventually agrees to do the responsible thing and continue the state’s successful Medicaid expansion plan, by dragging their feet New Hampshire Republicans could cause increased rates for all Granite Staters on the Health Insurance Marketplace,” added New Hampshire Democratic Party Chair Ray Buckley.  
 
“The evidence shows that New Hampshire’s expansion plan is working, and it’s time for members of both parties to come together and maintain our commitment to New Hampshire’s people, businesses, and economy by continuing the state’s expansion plan,” added Buckley.
 
BACKGROUND
 
Steve Ahnen and Henry Lipman: “Medicaid expansion is unquestionably helping Granite Staters”
… the question many will, and should, ask as the debate over reauthorization of the NHHPP goes on is: “Is it working?” While we are only a few months into the implementation of the NHHPP, the answer is an overwhelming “yes.” … As of the end of the fourth quarter of 2014, compared to the end of the fourth quarter of 2013, hospitals across New Hampshire saw a 17 percent reduction in the number of people who were treated in the emergency department who did not have insurance. We are also seeing reductions in the number of patients being treated in the inpatient and outpatient departments as well. We will continue to monitor these trends, but we expect that number will grow as more people become eligible for the program. [Union Leader, 4/13/15]