NHDP - Mitch McConnell Should Allow Binding Votes on Bipartisan Middle Class Bills

RELEASE: Kelly Ayotte Should Tell Mitch McConnell To Allow Binding Votes on Bipartisan Middle Class Bills
 
Bipartisan Majorities in the Senate Voted for Non-Binding Amendments Supporting Key Middle Class Priorities, Now Republican Leadership Needs to Allow Binding Votes
 
Concord, N.H. – Two weeks ago, bipartisan majorities in theSenate voted for non-binding amendments supporting key middle class priorities. Now, it’s time for Kelly Ayotte to tell Mitch McConnell to stop stalling and allow binding votes on these critical priorities.
 
The middle class policies that received bipartisan support include implementing paid sick leave, ending discrimination against pregnant workers, ensuring equal access to benefits for same sex couples, and passing middle class tax cuts.
 
“If Kelly Ayotte actually supports these middle class bills, and isn’t just interested in blatantly political posturing, she will immediately call on Mitch McConnell to allow binding votes on these critical middle class priorities,” said New Hampshire Democratic Party Chair Ray Buckley. “Implementing paid sick leave, ending discrimination against pregnant workers, ensuring equal access to benefits for same sex couples, and passing middle class tax cuts would have a real impact on New Hampshire’s middle class families, and these policies deserve a binding vote.”
 
BACKGROUND
 
Roll Call: After Budget Votes, Democrats Push Paid Sick Leave, Middle Class Tax Credits, Federal Benefits for Gay Couples
In a letter to the Kentucky Republican, a copy of which was obtained in advance by CQ Roll Call, nine Democratic senators called for votes on issues like paid sick leave and Social Security benefits for same-sex couples… Each of the four items identified by the Democratic signatories received broad support on non-binding amendment votes cast during the budget debate, with three of the four garnering in excess of the 60 votes that would be needed to overcome procedural hurdles and potential filibusters on the Senate floor. [Roll Call, 4/13/15]