NHDP - ICYMI: Nashua Telegraph: Trump's Immigration Comments Broke No New Ground

CONCORD, N.H. - While Trump’s incendiary comments start worrying national Republicans and even a New Hampshire GOP National Committeeman denounced them in the Washington Post, it’s important to note that Trump’s comments are nothing new for the Republican Party or the 2016 GOP candidates.

A Nashua Telegraph Op-Ed elaborates: “If you didn't know better, you might forget that the GOP has sought votes for years by stoking fear and anger toward Mexicans who enter this country illegally… It's hypocritical and unfair to put all this on Trump. He only repeated what his party's been saying all along.”

Click for the full article or read below.
 

Trump’s immigration comments broke no new ground // Nashua Telegraph, Leonard Pitts

 

In 2006, then-Arizona State Sen. Russell Pearce advocated the return of a 1954 program for the mass deportation of un­documented immigrants. It was called "Operation Wetback."

In 2010, Sen. David Vitter, Republican from Louisiana, released a campaign ad that depicted a bunch of seedy-looking Mexicans, some with gang bandannas, slipping through a hole in a border fence to invade America.

In 2011, Rep. Mo Brooks, Republican from Alabama, said of undocumented immigrants, "I will do anything short of shooting them" to make them stop "taking jobs from American citizens."

That same year, Republican presidential contender Herman Cain vowed to build an electri­fied border fence that would shock Mexicans who sought to slip into the country.

In 2013, Rep. Steve King, Republican from Iowa, said that for every illegal immigrant who becomes a valedictorian, there are another hundred with "calves the size of canta­loupes" because they are drug mules.

Yet the party is shocked and offended by what Donald Trump said? Jeb Bush calls his recent comments on undocu­mented Mexican immi­grants "extraordinarily ugly"? Sen. Marco Rubio finds them "not just offensive and inaccu­rate, but also divisive"? A major donor tells the Associated Press Trump should be excluded from the debates?

Beg pardon, but there is something rather precious in all this ostentatious umbrage. If you didn't know better, you might forget that the GOP has sought votes for years by stoking fear and anger toward Mexicans who enter this country illegally. If you weren't paying atten­tion, you might not know that various Republican officials and pundits routinely characterize those people - most of them just dirt poor and trying to put bread on the table - as a disease-ridden invasion force of drug smugglers and gang members, not to mention pregnant women splashing across the Rio Grande in order to drop so-called "anchor babies" on U. S. soil.

This is not to say Trump's words were not ugly. They were. "When Mexico sends its people, they're not sending their best," he said. "...They're sending people that have lots of problems and they're bringing those problems (to) us. They're bringing drugs, they're bringing crime, they're rapists, and some, I assume, are good people."

But ugly as it was, Trump's xenophobia broke no new ground. So you have to wonder at the pious denunciations it is generating. You're tempted to say people are reacting like this because Trump was blunter than we are used to. On the other hand, there is nothing particu­larly subtle or ambiguous about threatening to shock Mexicans. Maybe folks weren't paying at­tention before.

It's worth noting that Trump's comments came as he an­nounced his intention to run for president of the United States, a nation whose last census found about 32 million of us identify­ing as Mexican-American (some, presumably, good people). Indeed, Mexican Americans are far and away the largest group under the umbrella rubric "Hispanic." All the Cuban-, Puerto Rican-, Argentinean- and Spanish-Americans combined don't equal the number of Mexi­can Americans in this country. So when the GOP talks about "Hispanic" outreach, it is, in a very real sense, talking Mexi­can-American outreach. Yet this "outreach" seems always to be overshadowed by insult.

The party seems not to realize that you can't have it both ways, can't insult people, then ask them to vote for you. How telling is it that, even as party elders assure us his remarks don't represent the GOP, Trump vaults to second place in the polling of Republican contenders? It's a truth that gives the lie to these proclamations of mortal affront.

It's hypocritical and unfair to put all this on Trump. He only repeated what his party's been saying all along.

###