NH GOP - FALLOUT CONTINUES FROM GOVERNOR HASSAN'S RECKLESS BUDGET VETO

"Governor Denying Services To Some Of The State's Most Needy"

 

Concord - Today, the Portsmouth Herald editorial board wrote that Governor Hassan's budget was a "serious mistake", noting that the "vetoed budget added money for substance abuse prevention, treatment and recovery, mental health care, domestic violence prevention, and higher education."

 

"Governor Hassan's reckless budget veto has put critical state services for New Hampshire's most needy at risk," said NHGOP Chairman Jennifer Horn. "We are only beginning to see the serious consequences of Governor Hassan's politically-motivated veto. Governor Hassan should put her political ambitions aside and recognize that the needs of vulnerable Granite Staters are more important than career advancement."

 

Yesterday, WMUR covered the case of Doris Brown, a 92-year-old Laconia woman who had her home health care terminated. The budget Governor Hassan vetoed included a 5% increase in home health care funding.

 

Governor Hassan has a history of putting funding for vulnerable Granite Staters first on the chopping block. Earlier this year, nursing home residents demanded Governor Hassan restore $7 million in cuts in nursing home and home health care funding.

 

On Monday, the Associated Press said the "budget would have doubled money in prevention, treatment and recovery" for New Hampshire's "growing heroin and prescription drug abuse problem." Tym Rourke, Chair of Governor Hassan's Commission on Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention, said that the lack of increased funding means "continued waitlists" and "continued overdose deaths".

 

BACKGROUND

 

Associated Press: "Budget Would Have Doubled Money In Prevention, Treatment And Recovery" "Throughout the budget process, Republicans and Democrats alike called for greater efforts to address the state's growing heroin and prescription drug abuse problem. The budget would have doubled money in prevention, treatment and recovery fund to $6.7 million, allowing the state to begin investing in now-lacking recovery programs. Without the additional funding, the state can't start issuing requests for proposals for new programs and providers. (Kathleen Ronayne, "New Hampshire agencies, programs face budgetary uncertainty," Associated Press, 6/29/2015)

 

Associated Press: "For People Who Need Help, Advocates Say, The Delay Will Have Real Consequences...'That Means Continued Waitlists, That Means Continued Overdose Deaths'" "For people who need help, advocates say, the delay will have real consequences...'That means continued waitlists, that means continued overdose deaths,' said Tym Rourke, chair of the Governor's Commission on Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention, Treatment and Recovery. 'There is no substantive change we can expect to see around the substance abuse epidemic until we have the ability to provide those expanded services.'" (Kathleen Ronayne, "New Hampshire agencies, programs face budgetary uncertainty," Associated Press, 6/29/2015)

 

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