Press Releases

 

Wednesday
Jul222009

CHQ - Why Are Conservatives Drawn to the Tea Party Idea? 

Tea Parties and Conservatives
History News Network - Historical icons have long been used by groups as a symbol for their struggle or cause. Conservatives, more than any other group, latched on to the Tea Party as a rallying symbol for their movement against Big Government. [Find the Story at News From the Front]

Daily Lickskillet: Read Today's Lickskillet by Clicking Here.

Other Articles in News From The Front :

Hate Crimes Alert

Wexler responds to second protest outside his Boca Raton office

'Wake up,' protest group urges

 

All of these articles and many others can be accessed through http://conservativehq.com.

Wednesday
Jul222009

Shea-Porter Hosts Health Care Reform Forum with Key Industry Stakeholders  

Manchester, New Hampshire — Congresswoman Carol Shea-Porter hosted a health care forum in Manchester yesterday where she met with nearly a dozen major health industry stakeholders and discussed the upcoming health care reform legislation.

 

“I hosted this forum because I believe it’s important to get a wide range of ideas and perspectives regarding health care reform,” said Congresswoman Shea-Porter. “I support a public option choice and private insurance choices. Although key aspects of the health care bill are still being discussed, I am firmly committed to health care reform.”

 

Wednesday
Jul222009

DSCC - Politico: N.H. GOP divided on Ayotte  

Yet two credible GOP candidates - a former nominee for governor and a well-heeled businessman - have signaled that they'll also pursue the nomination, and the state GOP chairman, John H. Sununu, is indicating that he's not going to choose sides.
***
New Hampshire polls indicate that she's very popular among those who know her, but the majority of the electorate is still unfamiliar with her record - meaning a divisive primary could very easily drive up her negatives.

"She's well-respected with people in the law enforcement community, but we're talking about very elite groups. We don't know how she'll do connecting with voters and speaking to them on television," said Dante Scala, a political science professor at the University of New Hampshire. "It's a lot to learn in a short period of time, and that's the downside of being a fresh face."


________________________________

N.H. GOP divided on Ayotte
By: Josh Kraushaar
July 22, 2009 04:29 AM EST


The national Republican Party's prized Senate recruit in New Hampshire, former state Attorney General Kelly Ayotte, is meeting with resistance from local Republicans who aren't willing to hand over the nomination without a fight.

It's easy to see why the National Republican Senatorial Committee is so enamored of Ayotte. She's a youthful, female face in a party that has been criticized for not fielding a diverse crop of candidates. With deep New Hampshire roots and a law enforcement record that has drawn bipartisan praise during her five-year tenure, the 41-year-old Ayotte could prove to be a compelling alternative to the likely Democratic nominee, Rep. Paul Hodes (D-N.H.).

Indeed, to demonstrate its commitment behind her candidacy, the NRSC is even prepared to offer Ayotte its endorsement if she requests it.

Yet two credible GOP candidates - a former nominee for governor and a well-heeled businessman - have signaled that they'll also pursue the nomination, and the state GOP chairman, John H. Sununu, is indicating that he's not going to choose sides.

Instead, the famously prickly former governor says he'll use his "considerable warmth and charm" to ensure candidates don't engage in unduly negative attacks.

"Constructive primaries are a good thing. When Republican candidates get into a primary and attack Democrats and talk about their own personal positives, in the long run it helps the winner in the primary," said Sununu, who also served as chief of staff to President George H.W. Bush. "And that's the kind of primary we're going to make sure we have in New Hampshire."

It's hardly reassuring news to national party strategists, who worry that Ayotte, an appointed officeholder who has never before been on a ballot, could be damaged by a negative primary. In New Hampshire, where the primary is scheduled for September 2010, the eventual nominee will have less than two months to unite the party and gear up against Hodes.

A primary would also put the untested Ayotte under considerable pressure to raise money both locally and from national donors and could impede her ability to post a strong fundraising quarter right out of the gate.

New Hampshire polls indicate that she's very popular among those who know her, but the majority of the electorate is still unfamiliar with her record - meaning a divisive primary could very easily drive up her negatives.

"She's well-respected with people in the law enforcement community, but we're talking about very elite groups. We don't know how she'll do connecting with voters and speaking to them on television," said Dante Scala, a political science professor at the University of New Hampshire. "It's a lot to learn in a short period of time, and that's the downside of being a fresh face."

Since announcing her interest in running for the seat of retiring Sen. Judd Gregg (R-N.H.), Ayotte has largely remained mum about her political views. While her allies told POLITICO they've come away from meetings assured that she's a mainstream conservative who will speak out against the growth of government spending, even they don't know precisely where she stands on major issues ranging from the stimulus package to abortion rights.

"Kelly has studiously avoided partisanship and avoided political events throughout her career," said former state party chairman Fergus Cullen, who is not yet supporting any of the candidates. "She has avoided the spotlight whenever possible, she has avoided taking public positions on issues that didn't affect the attorney general's office."

Already, Ayotte's potential primary challengers are questioning her commitment to conservative principles. Investor Fred Tausch accused Ayotte, among other statewide officials, of supporting a state budget that could lead to the implementation of an income tax - a volatile issue in New Hampshire politics.

The state's 1996 gubernatorial nominee, Ovide Lamontagne, said he would have stepped aside for former Sen. John E. Sununu (R-N.H.) or former GOP Gov. Steve Merrill, but he won't be doing the same for Ayotte.

"I think she's a bright and capable lawyer who has not participated in the political process at all. She has never worked on a campaign, and no one knows what her political views are at this point," said Lamontagne, who recently hired political consultant Charlie Spies - the chief financial officer of Mitt Romney's presidential campaign - to advise him as he "tests the waters" for a Senate campaign.

"That's a consideration for a lot of people - they don't know where she'll be on any issue at this point."
This wouldn't be the first time Lamontagne bucked the establishment favorite. In 1996, he stunned New Hampshire insiders by defeating then-Rep. Bill Zeliff to win the GOP nomination for governor before losing to Democrat Jeanne Shaheen. In that race, he touted his socially conservative views to appeal to primary voters.

Since his loss, he has been practicing commercial law and has largely stayed out of elective politics, except for a stint as state party chairman for former Vice President Dan Quayle's short-lived presidential campaign in 1999.

"I'm liberated by the notion that I'm not the establishment candidate; I want to be the people's candidate who will stand up for Republican principles," Lamontagne said.

Tausch, the other potential candidate, is a newcomer to the state political scene who has quickly made an impact by forming a conservative political action committee that has spent nearly $400,000 on ads and mailers decrying the administration's pace of federal spending - and attacking Hodes in the process.

A onetime Obama supporter who donated the maximum amount to his general election campaign, Tausch quickly soured on the new president once he took office.

New Hampshire politicos believe his generous spending signals a Senate campaign of his own. He's hired several seasoned hands from former Sen. John E. Sununu's staff and tapped Michael Dennehy, a former adviser to Sen. John McCain's presidential campaign, to consult for his organization.

"His conservative fiscal message is a good one, but I think his flip-flop supporting a liberal Democrat to sounding like a conservative Republican will be very difficult for Republican voters to accept," said Merrill, who is an Ayotte supporter. "That said, he has deep pockets and shown a willingness to spend. You don't want to run against a multimillionaire."

Democrats aren't waiting around to define Ayotte. The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee produced a Web video last week comparing her decision to vacate the attorney general's office with Sarah Palin's decision to resign as governor of Alaska.

Aides to Democratic Gov. John Lynch claim that Ayotte pledged she would serve out her entire term as a precondition to being reappointed - something she will have to address now that she has filed papers for her Senate candidacy.

Some New Hampshire Republicans believe a contested primary might actually help Ayotte in the long haul, since it would provide her with some valuable campaign experience before facing the worst of the attacks.

"Here's why I like the primary: She gets hands-on practice before she meets Paul Hodes in the general election," said Merrill. "She needs to raise money in the primary; that's an important lesson to learn. She will have had the experience of a victory when she faces Paul Hodes. I think those things outweigh the quieter ride."

"Kelly's never been a candidate, and that's an entirely different skill set than being attorney general," said Tom Rath, a veteran New Hampshire GOP strategist who also served as the state's attorney general.
"This is a very sophisticated electorate up here - no one gets coronated," said Rath, who has not backed any candidate. "In this business, it's all about taking punches and fighting back. You've got to be able to take this kind of stuff."

Wednesday
Jul222009

DNC RELEASES NEW WEB AD: “PLAYING POLITICS” 

Video Calls Out ‘Party Of NO’ On Their Strategy To ‘KILL’ Health Care Reform

Watch: “Playing Politics”: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A154BmAkryQ

 

Washington, D.C.- The Democratic National Committee released a new web video today highlighting comments by Republican leaders, including Senators Graham and DeMint, stating publicly their hope that the President will fail in his attempt to reform our broken health care system. “Playing Politics” exposes the Republican Party’s opposition to health care reform for what it is: an overtly partisan strategy aimed at ‘breaking’ the President in order to score political points. Please see below for a statement from DNC Communications Director Brad Woodhouse:

 

“Over the last few dayswe've learned the true intentions of the Republican party when it comes to health care, and those intentions, while not surprising,are disturbing. Let's be clear - the same Republican party that let health care costs spiral out of control over the last eight years while protecting their special interest friends,is nowexpressly saying that theywant to‘kill’ health care reform andthat their interest isto ‘break’ the President politically. But, what's ‘broken’ is a supposed major political party dedicatedto ‘killing’ health carereform for purely political reasons whenthe average American family has seen anearly 80 percent increase in their health care premiums in this decade. What's ‘broken’ is a Republican party that insists on saying NO to reforming a system where nearly two-thirds of small businesses cannot afford to insure their employees.

 

“TheRepublican approach of working to kill health care reform when so many American families are struggling is not onlybroken, it's also irresponsible. Republicans would be better served if they focused on killing off this callous attitude within their party that puts fixing their ownpolitical problems ahead of fixing problems for American families.”

 

Watch: “Playing Politics”: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A154BmAkryQ

 

 

Script For DNC Web Ad "Playing Politics":

 

TEXT: When it comes to health care reform... Republicans are following
their longtime leader.

 

RUSH LIMBAUGH: I hope he fails.

 

TEXT: Basically I think he'll fail. - Sen. Lindsay Graham

SENATOR GRAHAM: Basically I think he’ll fail.

 

TEXT: If we're able to stop Obama on this, it will be his Waterloo.

SENATOR DEMINT: If we’re able to stop Obama on this, it will be his Waterloo. It will break him.

TEXT: It will break him. - Sen. Jim DeMint

PRESIDENT OBAMA: Now, there are some in this town who are content to perpetuate the status quo.

 

DAVID SHUSTER: What is the Republican plan?

SENATOR ENZI: No.

 

MODERATOR: Senator Gregg?

SENATOR GREGG: No.

 

MODERATOR: Senator Alexander?

SENATOR ALEXANDER: No.

 

NATIONAL PRESS CLUB MODERATOR: What will the political price for the Republican Party be if it succeeds in blocking health care reform?

 

TEXT: Despite insurance premiums doubling over the past decade, Republicans want to see health care reform fail. Source: Kaiser Family Foundation, 9/24/08

RUSH LIMBAUGH: I hope he fails.

SENATOR GRAHAM: “Basically, I think he’s fail.”

SENATOR DEMINT: “If we’re able to stop Obama on this, it will be his Waterloo. It will break him.”

PRESIDENT OBAMA: “This isn’t about me. This isn’t about politics. This is about a health care system that is breaking America’s families, breaking America’s businesses, and breaking America’s economy.”

 

TEXT: Tell Republicans: Stop rooting for failure and start fighting for the American people.

[DNC Disclaimer]

 

Tuesday
Jul212009

ICYMI: WSJ--The New Old 'Card Check' 

WALL STREET JOURNAL: THE NEW OLD 'CARD CHECK' (EDITORIAL)

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124804413309863431.html

Politicians don't typically broadcast their defeat, and when they do it pays to watch for the blindside hit. That's surely the case with last week's reports that six liberal Senators are abandoning part of labor's top priority, "card check" legislation.

The legislation to eliminate secret ballots in union elections has in fact been comatose for weeks, since Pennsylvania's Arlen Specter and Blanche Lincoln of Arkansas declared their opposition. So the real purpose of this "concession" is to shift to Plan B, which is to repackage most of what labor wants with new ribbons and wrapping. The bill that Senators Tom Harkin (Iowa), Mark Pryor (Arkansas), Mr. Specter and others are now considering would still give unions the whip hand in negotiations with management.

One proposal would slash the time for an organizing vote, requiring that it be held within five or 10 days after 30% of workers had signed cards asking for a union. The median time today is 38 days. Organizers want the rush because they know the more time workers have to learn about a union, the less they usually want one. Once employees hear the other side of the story, support dwindles.

This also explains a Big Labor demand to bar companies from requiring their workers to hear management's side during a union campaign. Labor supporters say this creates a "captive audience," but these meetings are one of management's few opportunities to address workers, since companies are barred from the sort of outreach allowed to union organizers -- such as visiting employees at home. At the same time, Senators want to give union organizers access to company property.

Democrats also aren't giving up on binding arbitration, which would let a federal arbitrator impose a contract if management and a newly established union at a work site aren't able to agree within 90 days. The provision would encourage unions to make maximum demands and play for time, knowing that an arbitrator could force management's hand. Binding arbitration also denies employees a vote on a contract.

Labor is desperate to rig the bargaining rules because most workers show time and again that they don't want a union. Americans know unions promise higher wages and benefits and more job security. But workers can also see what has happened to such highly unionized industries as steel, autos, airlines and many others. Unions couldn't save those jobs, and in fact they contributed to their demise with contracts that made the industries uncompetitive. Most workers would also rather not hand over a chunk of their paycheck in mandatory dues to finance the political agenda of labor leaders.

Democrats and the AFL-CIO are hoping that if they dump the unpopular secret ballot ban from card check, they can get to their magic number of 60 Senators. The business community and Republicans shouldn't be fooled and let Democrats from swing states off the hook. Card check under any cover is still a job killer