DSCC Says Sen Sununu Again Votes Against Change in Iraq

For the sixth time this year, Senator John Sununu voted today to stay the course in Iraq,rejecting a proposal to end the war by redeploying most U.S. troops by the summer of 2008. Sununu voted to allow President Bush to continue pursuing his failed Iraq policy with little accountability, despite the fact that a majority of Granite Staters say they support withdrawing troops.

“For the sixth time this year, John Sununu had an opportunity to vote for change in Iraq, and for the sixth time this year, he rejected it,” said DSCC spokesman Matthew Miller. “Granite Staters want a Senator who will demand change in Iraq, but all they’re getting from John Sununu is a rubber stamp for George Bush’s failed status quo.”

Sununu Has Now Voted Against Withdrawing U.S. Troops From Iraq SIX Times This Year. Today, Sununu once again voted against a bipartisan proposal that would require a shift of American troops away from combat in Iraq by the summer of 2008. Since the beginning of this year, Sununu has now voted with President Bush and against bringing U.S. troops home six times. [Vote346, 9/21/07;Vote 252, 7/18/07;Vote 147, 4/26/07;Vote 126, 3/29/07,Vote116, 3/27/07;Vote 75, 3/15/07;NPR, 7/17/07;New York Times, 9/20/07]

Solid Majority of Granite Staters Support Withdrawal From Iraq. Public polling shows that a majority of New Hampshire residents continue to stand firmly behind the withdrawal of US forces from Iraq. A July 2007 CNN/WMUR Granite State poll showed that 61 percent of New Hampshire adults backed the withdrawal of US forces from Iraq. In that poll, 34 percent of Granite Staters supported withdrawing US troops from Iraqby March 2008 while 27 percent favored the immediate withdrawal of US forces. In addition, a June 7 News/Suffolk University poll showed that a remarkable 72 percent of Granite Staters favored the withdrawal of US forces from Iraq. In that poll, 18 percent of likely voters favored the immediate withdrawal of US forces from Iraq,while a solid majority, 54 percent, supported the gradual withdrawal of US forces over a defined period. [UNH Granite State Release, 7/18/07; Suffolk University Release, 6/27/07]