Obama CampaignTakes Message of Middle Class Tax Fairness to New Hampshire Voters

MANCHESTER , NH—Barack Obama unveiled his middle class tax fairness policy in Washington today, and his New Hampshire campaign is taking that message directly to Granite State voters. Today, New Hampshire steering committee member, Senator Jackie Cilley hosts a roundtable in Rochester with voters who will benefit from Obama’s proposal. Tomorrow and Thursday, Obama supporters will host chats at senior centers around the state to discuss the plan with retirees who also will benefit from the Obama policy.

As President, Obama would provide atax credit to middle class Americans, implement a universal homeowner’s tax credit for those who don’t itemize their deductions, eliminate income taxes for seniors making less than $50,000, and simplify the tax code so that millions of Americans could complete their return in less than five minutes. He would also level the playing field for American business by closing corporate loopholes and cracking down on offshore tax havens. His full plan can be viewed HERE.

“As a Senator representing hardworking families, as a small business owner, and as someone who grew up in impoverished conditions, I’ve seen firsthand the strain that our tax code puts on working people,”Senator Cilley said. “Obama’s proposals will make a real difference, whether you’re a senior who will no longer have to pay income taxes, a parent who will get a substantial tax credit for your family, a homeowner who will benefit from mortgage credit, or someone who’s tired of paying others to prepare an unnecessarily complicated tax return.That’s the kind of relief that Granite Staters deserve.”

Obama’s plan will make a real difference for New Hampshire residents:

Ø The “Making Work Pay” tax credit will create a tax cut for 800,000 New Hampshire residents.

Ø The universal mortgage credit will help more than 40,000 homeowners in the state, most of whom earn less than $50,000 per year.

Ø Barack’s proposalto eliminate income taxes for senior citizens making less than $50,000 per year will provide direct relief for more than 120,000 seniors in the state.