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Entries in CEI (1328)

Friday
Mar232012

CEI Today: Food biotech, World Water Day, and property rights 

WORLD WATER DAY - ANGELA LOGOMASINI

 

CEI.org: Depoliticizing Groundwater

 

Today is the United Nation's officially declared "World Water Day," an occasion to call attention to the plight of many peoples of the world who lack access to clean water.  CEI's Angela Logomasini has discussed major problems with water management policy, including the lack of property rights:

Groundwater management problems in Jakarta Indonesia ... demonstrate the perils of poor water management policy. Because of over extraction from the aquifer, city residents must actually raise their houses regularly because the ground sinks as groundwater sources are consumed. Relatively unlimited and unmonitored access to the groundwater means that residents mine the water without limit—despite the consequences.

Such problems occur around the world, making water supply the source of contentious political battles. The issue is not simply short supply or that the world is running out of water, as some have suggested. The problem rests mainly with our water management regimes. > Read more on CEI.org

> What can Congress do about water policy?

> Interview Angela Logomasini

 

FOOD BIOTECHNOLOGY - GREG CONKO

Monday, March 26: Agricultural Innovation in the 21st Century, CEI on Capitol Hill

On Monday, CEI's Greg Conko will speak on U.S. and foreign regulation of food biotechnology and how an over-precaution has made it more difficult for scientists to develop, breed, and sell innovative new crop varieties that increase agricultural productivity and lighten farming’s environmental footprint.

 

> Come to the Capitol Hill event

> Interview Greg Conko

 

> Read about biotech issues on CEI.org

PROPERTY RIGHTS - HANS BADER


Globalwarming.org: Supreme Court Allows Challenge to EPA Power Grab, Cites CEI Brief in Sackett v. EPA; But Property Rights Still In Jeopardy

 

In recent years, the EPA has sought to block land from being used by claiming that vast tracts of seemingly dry land are actually “wetlands.”  The Clean Water Act gives it the power to regulate “waters of the United States.”  The EPA has interpreted that expansively to effectively mean “moistures of the United States,” treating perfectly ordinarily land as a “wetland” simply because water happens to occasionally flow downhill from it into a ditch or creek.  The four liberal Supreme Court justices largely bought this argument in the 2006 Rapanos case, so the Supreme Court is just one vote away from accepting this interpretation, which would render much of America a restricted “wetland” and financially ruin countless families.  Thus, property rights in America are hanging by a thread. >View the full commentary on Globalwarming.org

 

HUMAN ACHIEVEMENT HOUR

Saturday, March 31


HAH is an annual event to recognize and celebrate human achievement and innovation. During the hour, participants are asked to listen to music, surf the internet, have a glass of beer, and generally enjoy the fruits of the human mind which would not have been possible in a world where conservation restrains advancement.

HAH can be
celebrated anywhere from 8:30pm to 9:30pm. In addition, CEI will be hosting a celebration at our headquarters in Washington, DC and live streaming our event online.


Join the HAH Facebook group.

 

Friday
Mar232012

CEI Weekly: The JOBS Act Promises New Hope for Small Businesses

Friday, March 23, 2012

 

 

 

Feature: CEI's John Berlau explains how the JOBS Act could be a boost for small businesses.

FEATURE: The JOBS Act Promises New Hope for Small Businesses

 

The Senate passed the JOBS Act this week. CEI Director for the Center for Investors and Entrepreneurs John Berlau has high hopes for the bill, which passed with bipartisan support. One provision of the bill will delay onerous financial regulation for new public firms until five years after the firms go public, which should help start-ups and small businesses in need of investors. Read John Berlau's op-eds on the Jobs Act here. Also, see Berlau's posts on OpenMarket.org here and here.

 

 

SHAPING THE DEBATE

 

Cheap Gasoline and Human Rights

Sam Kazman's letter to the editor in The Wall Street Journal

 

The Real Reasons You Should Shun Goldman Sachs

Bill Frezza's op-ed in Real Clear Markets

 

Let States Regulate Internet Gambling

Michelle Minton's op-ed in The Washington Examiner

 

Two Budget Proposals Demonstrate the Depth of the Political Divide in the U.S.

Iain Murray's column in The Daily Mail

 

Chemical Law Is Not Broken, Doesn't Need to Be 'Fixed'

Angela Logomasini's op-ed in The Washington Examiner

 

Why Regulations Aren't Good--Again

Wayne Crews' column in Forbes

 

The Export-Import Bank Should Be an Ex-Bank

Iain Murray's op-ed in The American Spectator

 

Justices Allow Challenge to EPA Control of Wetlands

CEI's citation in The New York Times

 

Witnesses Warn Verizon-Comcast Deal Will Damage Competition

Ryan Radia's citation in ArsTechnica

 

 

 

 

                     

 

 

 

CEI PODCAST

 

March 22, 2012: Human Achievement Hour

 

From 8:30 to 9:30 pm on Saturday, March 31, buildings in major cities around the world will go dark in observance of Earth Hour. The point is to show that modernity and the environment are incompatible. At the same time as Earth Hour, millions of people will leave their lights on to celebrate Human Achievement Hour. Michelle Minton, CEI’s Fellow in Consumer Policy Studies and also the founder of Human Achievement Hour, explains.

 

 

Wednesday
Mar212012

CEI Today: JOBS Act, Export-Import Bank, and new reg reform

EXPORT-IMPORT BANK - IAIN MURRAY

Spectator.org: The Export-Import Bank Should Be an Ex-Bank

Among the nation's failing financial institutions the Export-Import Bank has received little notice. Now, however, the House and Senate are considering whether to reauthorize the bank. They should not. It was a bad idea to begin with, and the market is currently developing better ways to meet its stated goals without putting taxpayer money at risk. It is time to do away with this outdated mercantilist institution. > View the full commentary on Spectator.org

> Interview Iain Murray

 

REGULATORY REFORM - WAYNE CREWS


CEI.org: OMB Guidance on Cost of Federal Regulation "Inadequate"

 

On Monday, the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs within the White House Office of Management and Budget released guidance to agencies on “Cumulative Effects of Regulations” with an emphasis on enhancing net benefits. CEI regulatory policy expert Wayne Crews welcomed the move but called it inadequate:
 

OIRA’s guidance is a worthwhile yet inadequate step. OMB does present an annual Report to Congress on the Benefits and Costs of Federal Regulations with a 10-year lookback, but the last time it assembled a cumulative cost number was 2002. An explicit cumulative or redundancy burden assessment is something new and welcome.

However, the emphasis on potentially self-serving agency-assessed net benefits underscores yet again the reality that improving regulatory outcomes fundamentally requires Congress to answer for rule impacts—such as via expedited votes on “economically significant” ($100-million-plus) regulations (The REINS Act is an example).> Read the analysis on CEI.org


> Interview Wayne Crews

 

JOBS ACT - JOHN BERLAU

 

Spectator.org:The JOBS Act and the Maxine Waters Test


CEI's John Berlau explains whythe Senate should pass the JOBS Act:

But the question remains: once a bill has investor protections accepted by Maxine Waters, Barney Frank, and the Obama administration, what exactly do you need further protection from? The answer is that these Senators wish to protect the Wall-Street centric system of securities regulation enacted eight decades ago, when many households didn't have telephones, from any meaningful modernization for the age of the Internet. While Republicans are accused of being stuck in the '50s on cultural issues, it is fair to say that these Democrats are mired in the 1930s when it comes to entrepreneurs' accessing of capital. > Read the full commentary on Spectator.org


> Interview John Berlau

 

HUMAN ACHIEVEMENT HOUR

Saturday, March 31


HAH is an annual event to recognize and celebrate human achievement and innovation. During the hour, participants are asked to listen to music, surf the internet, have a glass of beer, and generally enjoy the fruits of the human mind which would not have been possible in a world where conservation restrains advancement.

HAH can be
celebrated anywhere from 8:30pm to 9:30pm. In addition, CEI will be hosting a celebration at our headquarters in Washington, DC and live streaming our event online.


Join the HAH Facebook group.
 

Tuesday
Mar202012

CEI Today: Obama gas prices, Internet gambling, regulation facts & figures 

OBAMA GAS PRICES - MYRON EBELL

Globalwarming.org: President Continues Frantic Response to High Gasoline Prices

After speeches the last three weeks on why he isn’t to blame for high gasoline prices, I thought President Barack Obama would be moving on to other issues.  But in a sign of how desperate the White House is becoming about the threat gas prices pose to the President’s re-election, the President on Thursday, 15th March, gave yet another speech on the topic.


Mr. Obama took credit (completely undeservedly) for increasing domestic oil production, but then argued that increasing oil production won’t solve the problem of high gasoline prices.  According to the President, the only lasting solution is to continue pouring taxpayer dollars into subsidizing alternatives to oil.  Once we replace gasoline and diesel with other fuels, then we will have solved the problem of recurring spikes in gasoline prices.


The problem with the President’s argument is that the alternatives are likely to cost more, not less, than the oil they are replacing. 

> View the full commentary on Globalwarming.org

> See also: Cheap Gasoline and Human Rights by Sam Kazman, in today's Wall Street Journal


> Interview Myron Ebell

 

INTERNET GAMBLING - MICHELLE MINTON

 

Washington Examiner: Let states regulate Internet gambling

 

In a recent op-ed in The Washington Examiner, former Pennsylvania governor and Homeland Security chief Tom Ridge and former FBI Director Louis Freeh called for immediate federal regulation of Internet gambling.

Ridge and Freeh, who are employed by Fair Play USA a lobbying group funded by the largest Las Vegas casinos, argue that federal rules are necessary for law enforcement to be able to tackle interstate crime and to keep minors from accessing online games. This is far from the truth. > Read the full commentary on WashingtonExaminer.com

> Interview Michelle Minton

 

REGULATION - RYAN YOUNG


Openmarket.org: 10 Thousand Commandments of federal regulations


Just another week in the world of regulation: 72 new final rules were published last week, up from 64 the previous week. That’s the equivalent of a new regulation every 2 hours and 20 minutes, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. All in all, 725 final rules have been published in the Federal Register this year. If this keeps up, the total tally for 2012 will be 3,492 new rules. 


> Highlights from final rules published on Openmarket.org

> For more data, updated daily, go to TenThousandCommandments.com


> Interview Ryan Young on America's regulatory burden

 

HUMAN ACHIEVEMENT HOUR

Saturday, March 31


HAH is an annual event to recognize and celebrate human achievement and innovation. During the hour, participants are asked to listen to music, surf the internet, have a glass of beer, and generally enjoy the fruits of the human mind which would not have been possible in a world where conservation restrains advancement.

HAH can be
celebrated anywhere from 8:30pm to 9:30pm. In addition, CEI will be hosting a celebration at our headquarters in Washington, DC and live streaming our event online.


Join the HAH Facebook group.

 

Saturday
Mar172012

CEI Weekly: Senate Votes No on "Pickens Payout"

Friday, March 16, 2012

 

 

 

Feature: CEI helps defeat proposed subsidies for the natural gas industry.

FEATURE: Senate Votes No on "Pickens Payout"

 

Natural gas mogul T. Boone Pickens is already a billionaire, but that hasn't stopped him from lobbying Congress for handouts. This week, the Senate rejected  an amendment that would have subsidized natural gas vehicles and fueling stations. CEI's Center for Energy and the Environment has long worked to expose the "Pickens Plan" as the corporate welfare that it is. See the GlobalWarming.org posts below, and listen to the podcast (right) for more information.

 

Myron Ebell: Strange Bedfellows Coalition (CEI and Greenpeace!) Urges Senate to Oppose NAT Gas Plan (a.k.a, the Pickens Payout)

Marlo Lewis: Senate to Consider Pickens-Your-Pocket Boondoggle Bill

William Yeatman: What's Wrong With This Picture?

Brian McGraw: T. Boone Pickens Still Wants Subsidies

Myron Ebell: President Obama Wants to Help the Little Guys--Especially if They're Named Boone Pickens and George Soros

 

SHAPING THE DEBATE

 

An EPA Power Grab

Marlo Lewis' op-ed in The National Review

 

Bill Clinton's Too Spiteful to Help Govern

Ryan Young's book review in RealClearPolicy

 

Raising the Tipped Minimum Wage Does More Harm Than Good

Trey Kovacs and Vincent Vernuccio's op-ed in The Washington Times

 

The Regulatory Path to Full Employment

Ryan Young's op-ed in The American Spectator

 

Rising Sea Levels Seen As Threat to Coastal U.S.

Myron Ebell's citation in The New York Times

 

Report Maps U.S. Risks from Rising Seas in Warming World

Myron Ebell's citation in The New York Times Blogs

 

Highway Bill Now Over to John Boehner

Marc Scribner's citation in Politico

 

Verizon's Deal With Cable Companies Finds Supporters, Detractors

Ryan Radia's citation in eWeek

 

When 'Protections' Are Toxic

Angela Logomasini's citation on OneNewsNow

 

 

 

                     

 

 

 

CEI PODCAST

 

March 15, 2012: T. Boone Pickens Amendment Fails

 

The Senate this week voted down a highway bill amendment that would massively financially benefit natural gas mogul T. Boone Pickens. Senior Fellow Marlo Lewis explains why the Senate did the right thing, and why Washington shouldn’t be in the business of picking winners and losers in the energy marketplace.