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Entries in Heart Disease (5)

Saturday
Apr122014

NH DHHS - As Part of Achieving Million Hearts Initiative, DHHS Receives Grant from  ASTHO

Concord, NH – The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Service

(DHHS), Division of Public Health Services, in partnership with the

University of New Hampshire, Institute of Health Policy and Practice,

applied for and was one of nine states to receive a grant from the

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO) to

participate in the Million Hearts Learning Collaborative. Through this

initiative, ASTHO supports states in utilizing a Quality Improvement (QI)

process to collaborate with clinical, community, and public health partners

to implement best practices and proven policies that identify, control, and

improve rates of high blood pressure with the aim of achieving the Million

Hearts goal.



Other partners include Cheshire Medical Center/Dartmouth Hitchcock–Keene,

Lamprey Health Clinic–Nashua, and the Manchester Community Health Center.

For this proposal, New Hampshire focused its blood pressure control

initiatives around developing and using patient registries and to look at

opportunities to engage patients in managing their condition. NH used the

Cheshire Medical Center/Dartmouth Hitchcock model that showed demonstrated

results in BP control



“This is a tremendous opportunity for us and our partnering healthcare

organizations,” said Dr. José Montero, Director of Public Health at DHHS.

“High blood pressure is sort of a precursor to future problems, it is all

too common, and there are simple steps we should all take to help keep our

blood pressure under control, including eating a healthy diet, exercising,

and limiting salt intake.”



Heart disease is the second leading cause of death in New Hampshire and

stroke is the fifth leading cause. The Million Hearts™ is a national

initiative launched in September 2011 to prevent one million heart attacks

and strokes over the next five years. The Centers for Disease Control and

Prevention (CDC) and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) are

the co-leaders of Million Hearts™ within the U.S. Department of Health and

Human Services, working alongside other federal agencies including the

National Institutes of Health, the Agency for Healthcare Research and

Quality, and the Food and Drug Administration. The American Heart

Association is one of many key private-sector partners.



Million Hearts brings together a wide range of heart disease and stroke

prevention program policies and activities to raise awareness among health

care providers, private-sector organizations, policymakers, and consumers

about what can be done to prevent heart disease and stroke and help

Americans live longer, healthier, and more productive lives.



Americans can take steps to help achieve the Million Hearts™ goal by taking

steps towards a healthier life. These include:

Maintain a normal weight

Get at least 30 minutes of physical activity most days

Limit alcohol intake

Eat more fresh fruits and vegetables

Avoid tobacco and

Reduce salt

Know your ABCS:

8 Aspirin – talk to a healthcare provider about whether you should

take aspirin

8 Blood Pressure – have your blood pressure checked, talk to a

healthcare provider re: how often

8 Cholesterol – have your cholesterol levels checked

8 Smoking Cessation



For more information about the Million Hearts initiative, visit

www.millionhearts.hhs.gov  To contact the Heart Disease and Stroke

Prevention Program at DHHS call 1-800-852-3345. For more information about

quitting smoking, eating healthier, and exercising more, visit the DHHS

website at www.dhhs.nh.gov  or the CDC website at www.cdc.gov

Wednesday
Feb122014

NH DHHS - Congratulations to Cheshire Medical Center/Dartmouth-Hitchcock Keene for Million Hearts Award

Concord, NH – Cheshire Medical Center/Dartmouth-Hitchcock Keene (CMC/DHK)

was recognized by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as a

Million Hearts 2013 Hypertension Control Champion. CMC/DHK was one of more

than 60 practices around the country nominated for the award and one of

only nine chosen for their work with patients to help them control their

blood pressure and in preventing heart attacks and strokes.



Nearly 1 in 3 adults in the United States has high blood pressure, also

known as hypertension, but fewer than half of them have it under control.

CMC/DHK was recognized for implementing a new initiative that has improved

control (blood pressure readings of less than 140/90) among its patients

from 69% in 2010 to over 84% in 2013.



“I am extremely proud of the work the staff here at Cheshire Medical

Center/Dartmouth-Hitchcock Keene have put into this program,” said Don

Caruso, MD, MPH, Medical Director at CMC/DHK. “This is an excellent

illustration of our goal to lead by example and this has gone a long way

toward improving the health of our community inside and outside the

facility.”



An interdisciplinary team worked together at CMC/DHK to create a

coordinated approach across all of their primary care offices and specialty

departments. Some of the steps this group put into place were new equipment

and education protocols, a Hypertension Registry, no-cost Nurse Clinic

check-ups for high readings, and new patient education materials.



“Congratulations to Cheshire Medical Center/Dartmouth-Hitchcock Keene for

their innovative thinking and dedication to improving the rates of high

blood pressure in their community,” said Dr. José Montero, Director of

Public Health at the New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services

(DHHS). “Hypertension and heart disease are a critical health issue that we

must all work to tackle, so it is especially rewarding to be able to

recognize CMC/DHK for their hard work.”



For more information about the 2013 Hypertension Control Challenge and the

2013 Champions, visit

http://millionhearts.hhs.gov/newsevents/hypertension_control_champions.html

. For more information about controlling high blood pressure and its

effects, visit the DHHS website at

http://www.dhhs.nh.gov/dphs/cdpc/hdsp.htm and the Centers for Disease

Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov . For more on the CMC/CHK initiative,

visit www.cheshiremed.org

Wednesday
Feb122014

NH DHHS - Department of Health Recognizes National American Heart Month to Promote Heart Disease Awareness

Concord, NH - The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services

(DHHS), Division of Public Health Services (DPHS), Heart Disease and Stroke

Prevention Program is recognizing February as American Heart Month. Heart

disease can lead to heart attack, stroke, heart failure, and death. It is

the leading cause of death for both men and women across the country and

the second leading cause of death in New Hampshire.



One of the main risk factors for heart disease is high blood pressure.

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), about 1

in 3 U.S. adults have high blood pressure, which increases the risk for

heart disease and stroke. High blood pressure also costs the nation $47.5

billion annually in direct medical expenses and $3.5 billion each year in

lost productivity. Both men and women can lower their risk of high blood

pressure and heart disease by leading a healthy lifestyle.



“When it comes to lowering one’s risk for high blood pressure and heart

disease,” said Dr. José Montero, Director of Public Health at DHHS, “it is

so important for men and women to understand their risk and take more steps

toward prevention.” “According to the CDC, only about 47% of people with

high blood pressure have it under control. There is much we can do to

improve our health and decrease our chances for heart disease, and it’s

time we all take a step toward better health.”



Take these steps toward a healthier life and a healthier heart:

Maintain a normal weight

Get at least 30 minutes of physical activity most days

Limit alcohol intake

Eat more fresh fruits and vegetables

Avoid tobacco and

Reduce salt

Know your ABCS:

Aspirin – talk to a healthcare provider about whether you should

take aspirin

Blood Pressure – have your blood pressure checked, talk to a

healthcare provider re: how often

Cholesterol – have your cholesterol levels checked

Smoking Cessation and

Take control of your heart health by following your doctor’s

instructions for medications and treatment.



For more information about heart disease, visit the American Heart

Association at www.heart.org, the Million Hearts Campaign at

www.millionhearts.hhs.gov, and the Centers for Disease Control and

Prevention website at www.cdc.gov/heartdisease and the NH Heart Disease

Stroke Prevention Program at http://www.dhhs.state.nh.us/dphs/cdpc/hdsp.htm

Friday
Feb012013

NH Department of Health Recognizes National Wear Red Day to Promote Heart Disease Awareness

Concord, NH - The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services

(DHHS), Division of Public Health Services (DPHS), Heart Disease and Stroke

Prevention Program is recognizing the 10th anniversary of Wear Red Day on

February 1st and February as American Heart Month. Wear Red Day is an

effort to raise awareness about women and heart disease. Heart disease is

the leading cause of death for women across the country and the second

leading cause of death in New Hampshire.



According to the American Heart Association, one in four women die of heart

disease, but only about half realize heart disease is their number one

killer. Fewer than half know what are considered healthy levels for

cardiovascular risk factors such as blood pressure and cholesterol. Heart

disease is also the number one killer of men in the U.S., but the good news

is that both men and women can lower their risk of heart disease by as much

as 82% by leading a healthy lifestyle. The American Heart Association first

launched the Go Red for Women campaign in 2003 to try to change these

numbers.



“It is so important for women to understand their risk and take more steps

toward prevention,” said Dr. José Montero, Director of Public Health at

DHHS. “The Million Hearts partnership launched in 2011 among states, the

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Centers for Medicare

and Medicaid is also aiming to reduce the number or heart attacks and

strokes by 1 million by the year 2017. The steps we can take require

commitment and may take some practice but they are well worth it.”



Take these steps toward a healthier life and a healthier heart:

GET UP and GET ACTIVE by exercising for 30 minutes several days a

week.

KNOW your ABCS:

Appropriate Aspirin Therapy

Blood Pressure Control

Cholesterol Management

Smoking Cessation

STAY STRONG by eating a heart-healthy diet that is high in fresh

fruits and vegetables and low in sodium, saturated and trans fats,

and cholesterol.

TAKE CONTROL of your heart health by following your doctor’s

instructions for medications and treatment.



The signs and symptoms of a heart attack can include:

Chest discomfort - uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness, or

pain in the center of your chest. It can last for more than a few

minutes or go away and come back.

Upper body discomfort - pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the

back, neck, jaw, or stomach.

Shortness of breath - with or without chest discomfort.

Other signs - may include breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea, or

lightheadedness.

As with men, women’s most common heart attack symptom is chest pain

or discomfort. But women are somewhat more likely than men to

experience some of the other common symptoms, particularly shortness

of breath, nausea/vomiting, and back or jaw pain.



If you experience any of these signs and symptoms, seek immediate medical

attention or call 911.



For more information, visit the American Heart Association at www.heart.org

 the Million Hearts Campaign at www.millionhearts.hhs.gov , and the Centers

for Disease Control and Prevention website at www.cdc.gov/heartdisease .

Friday
Feb032012

NH Department of Health Recognizes National Wear Red Day to Promote Heart Disease Awareness

Concord, NH - The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services

(DHHS), Division of Public Health Services (DPHS), Heart Disease and Stroke

Prevention Program is recognizing Wear Red Day on February 3rd and February

as American Heart Month. Wear Red Day is an effort to raise awareness of

women and heart disease. Heart disease is the leading cause of death for

women across the country and the second leading cause of death in New

Hampshire.



According to the American Heart Association, one in three women die of

heart disease. The American Heart Association also indicates that only 55%

of women realize heart disease is their number one killer, and fewer than

half know what are considered healthy levels for cardiovascular risk

factors such as blood pressure and cholesterol. The good news is that both

men and women can lower their risk of heart disease by as much as 82% by

leading a healthy lifestyle. The American Heart Association first launched

the Go Red for Women campaign in 2004 to try to change these numbers.



“More women die in the U.S. from heart disease than the next four causes of

death combined, including all forms of cancer,” said Dr. José Montero,

Director of Public Health at DHHS. “The Go Red for Women initiative is

meant to raise awareness, educate, and encourage women to take charge of

their health. There is much we can do to improve our health and decrease

our chances for heart disease, such as eating a healthy diet full of fruits

and vegetables, quitting smoking, exercising more, and getting a physical

exam regularly. It is also important to know the warning signs for a heart

attack because they are sometimes different for women.”



The signs and symptoms of a heart attack can include:

Chest discomfort - uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness, or

pain in the center of your chest. It lasts more than a few minutes,

or goes away and comes back.

Upper body discomfort - pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the

back, neck, jaw, or stomach.

Shortness of breath - with or without chest discomfort.

Other signs – may include breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea, or

lightheadedness.

As with men, women’s most common heart attack symptom is chest pain

or discomfort. But women are somewhat more likely than men to

experience some of the other common symptoms, particularly shortness

of breath, nausea/vomiting, and back or jaw pain.



If you experience any of these signs and symptoms, seek immediate medical

attention or call 911.



For more information about the American Heart Association, the Go Red for

Women Campaign, Wear Red Day, or American Heart Month, visit these

websites: www.heart.org , www.cdc.gov/features/heartmonth , or

www.goredforwomen.org  To contact the Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention

Program at DHHS call 603-271-4544.