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Entries in Josiah Bartlett Center (120)

Wednesday
Apr092014

Josiah Bartlett Center - Bow Plant Saves Ratepayers Millions 

Weekly Update from the
Josiah Bartlett Center


Keeping you up to date on our latest research
on the issues impacting New Hampshire
 

When it costs more to heat your house, your electricity is cheaper. Actually there isn’t a direct correlation between the two but cold weather – and we’ve had plenty of it – drives both dynamics. One utility-owned power plant in New Hampshire is something of a political football but is currently saving ratepayers well over $100 million this year.

The electric market in New England is all about gas. The electric market is not state specific but regional and our region comprises the six New England states. Whether a power plant is in New Hampshire or Rhode Island is immaterial. Power is sold into a regional market which doesn’t care which state the plant is in.

The lion’s share of electricity in New England comes from natural gas so gas is said to set the price. Every resource bids into the market a price at which they are willing to supply a set amount of power. The sources are then “stacked” from least to highest bid until the power need is reached. All accepted providers then get that “clearing price” regardless of what their individual bids were. Gas generally sets the price as the last accepted bid....Click here to keep reading

Saturday
Mar292014

Josiah Bartlett Center - Dickens, Budgets, and Charter Schools 

Weekly Update from the
Josiah Bartlett Center


Keeping you up to date on our latest research
on the issues impacting New Hampshire
Two issues this week. Charter Schools and Charles Dickens. I enjoyed writing the piece which uses my favorite Charles Dickens quote to pass on the advice of Mr. Micawber to today’s lawmakers (though, of course, you and I could benefit by reminding ourselves of this truism now and then). You don’t have to be the greatest Dickens fan to believe that Micawber’s insight is as profound as it is simple.
 
The second issues unfolded last week. Distressingly, charter schools are sometimes used as a political football and otherwise sensible, seemingly non-controversial proposals get caught in the political vortex. That happened with a bill related to a modest charter funding change. Problematically, I made a mistake and needed to correct it in a column two days later. Both columns are reproduced here. Everything I said in the first column about misleading information was true with the exception of authorship. Charter schools were being attacked with incorrect information designed to confuse the issue. That information was contradicted by the official fiscal note produced by the department of education. I assume that the department wasn’t the author of the contradictory and incorrect information. I was wrong. In fact, the department authored and stands by both the right information and its incorrect rebuttal. If one is right the other is wrong but they have the same author. No wonder legislators were confused and changed their mind. It is very sad but the attack on charter schools continues despite their amazing success and is at least somewhat more muted here than in places like New York City.
 

The great economic principle of our time comes not from an economist or a banker but from the great Mr. Micawber, a somewhat comic character created by Charles Dickens.  Wilkins Micawber had figured out the central organizing fact of modern life when he suggested to young David Copperfield, “Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen pounds nineteen and six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery. The blossom is blighted, the leaf is withered, the God of day goes down upon the weary scene, and  – and in short you are for ever floored.”...Click here to keep reading

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In Wednesday’s column about a misleading attack on charter school funding, I made a big mistake. I want to correct my mistake about the source of the very misleading information that was circulated and explain to you how I made the mistake and the problem with the information. It’s important that you feel free to agree or disagree with my conclusions but not have cause to doubt my information....Click here to keep reading

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A modest normalization of charter school funding, although long overdue, has become a political football and subject of misinformed and purposely misleading arguments to try and kill it. The truth, easily discovered, is that the proposal covers fewer than 2% of students and involves less than 2% of state education funding and continues to ask charter schools to prosper with less than half the funding of traditional schools....Click here to keep reading

Wednesday
Mar192014

Josiah Bartlett Center - The Rainy Day Fund and February Obamacare Data 

Weekly Update from the
Josiah Bartlett Center


Keeping you up to date on our latest research
on the issues impacting New Hampshire
Discipline Today Saves Trouble Tomorrow

Every legislative session there are 3 or 4 issues which dominate the media’s attention but some of the most important long term decisions pass by with little notice. You’d be forgiven for thinking the gas tax, gambling, and Medicaid expansion are the only three issues before the legislature. These are important but you’ll forgive me if I take a moment to talk about the state budget.

Too often legislatures focus on the budget one year and completely ignore it the next year. The budget passed last year was balanced in its own way but had a few problems that the legislature wants to correct. The most important correction is a simple but controversial partial correction to the state’s rainy day fund...Click here to keep reading

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4715 Obamacare Enrollments in February
and an Updated Look at the Pool

 
5,417 Granite Staters selected an insurance policy on the federal exchange in February. Since open enrollment began in October a total of 21,578 people have selected coverage. Overall, there has been very little change in the demographics of the pool since January, which is to be expected since as the pool grows larger, the harder it is to change the numbers...Click here to keep reading
Monday
Mar032014

Josiah Bartlett Center - Medicaid Expansion: Issue of the Week

Weekly Update from the
Josiah Bartlett Center


Keeping you up to date on our latest research
on the issues impacting New Hampshire


 
With the Senate Medicaid Expansion Plan under consideration this week, we thought we’d share with you more opinions than just our own. First, we include a piece from James and Michael Sununu, business consultants and friends of the Bartlett Center, which makes the case for why this would be a bad policy and particularly at this time. Second is a more detailed piece from Maine. A respected policy leader in Maine details Maine’s own experience with Medicaid Expansion and why they have chosen not to repeat their mistake. The version includes many links to data and analysis so you need not take his word but can check the tape yourself. Finally, is my third piece in as many weeks on this issue which explains why this is no compromise and how a real compromise might still be possible if politicians were actually interested in one. I’m not sure they are.
 
                                                                                               ~Charlie
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Wrong Policy for New Hampshire at the Wrong Time

Michael and James Sununu

Politics and governing aren’t the same thing, but they are inevitably intertwined. As much as we would like otherwise, political considerations often drive policy decisions. 
Sometimes the repercussions are small.

In the pending decision over Medicaid expansion, however, the stakes are huge and it would be a serious mistake for Republicans in the state Senate to make this a political decision. The potential for the largest-ever expansion of state government should be considered only on the merits of “Is this good public policy?” Unfortunately, in the face of significant evidence that this policy will not work, it looks like the strongest driving force on this issue for the Senate GOP is that, politically, “we need to do something....
Click here to keep reading

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Maine to NH: Don't Make Our Medicaid Mistakes

Kenneth Fredette, Maine House GOP Leader

When I heard that New Hampshire was considering an expansion of its Medicaid program under Obamacare, the first thought I had was a quote from Dante’s “Inferno ”: “Abandon all hope, ye who enter here.”

I say this as the Republican leader in the Maine House of Representatives and as someone who has served on my state’s Appropriations Committee, where we spent countless late nights trying to patch the Medicaid-induced leaks in our state budget after past expansions...
Click here to keep reading

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A Real Medicaid Compromise is Still Possible

Charlie Arlinghaus

Some supporters of the Senate Medicaid Expansion Plan would have you believe the only two choices are their non-compromise and just saying no. As is typical, the reality is far more complicated. Most conservative opponents of the Senate’s Medicaid Expansion are more than willing to support a real compromise and have a more detailed knowledge of the plan and therefore its flaws than the public statements of some sponsors indicate they do...Click here to keep reading
Sunday
Feb232014

Josiah Bartlett Center - Behind the Curtain on Medicaid Expansion 

Weekly Update from the
Josiah Bartlett Center


Keeping you up to date on our latest research
on the issues impacting New Hampshire


Senate Medicaid Expansion Plan Not Quite As Advertised

The Senate Medicaid Expansion Plan was released this week so we could all see the details and find out that the spin and the reality of the program are not quite the same.

Let’s start by dismissing the assertion that this program is somehow a unique New Hampshire approach. That just isn’t so. Iowa passed this same Medicaid expansion plan last May and a few states have had similar ideas in the interim. The New Hampshire version differs in slight ways, none of which make it better....Click here to keep reading

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Medicaid Expansion is Bad Medicine for New Hampshire

The recently announced deal in the New Hampshire Senate of a “framework” to expand Medicaid is a bad deal for our state’s future. The fundamental problem is not just that the plan implements a key component of Obamacare here, but it continues to build on a profoundly flawed Medicaid program desperately in need of reform.

Medicaid, in its current form, is a bulky, inefficient program that hasn’t kept up with the times. It was created in 1964 and, like most government programs, simply hasn’t evolved as proficiently as other market-driven products. Other than Corvettes, pretty much everything we buy today is better and less expensive than the 1964 counterparts, but Medicaid’s basic identity hasn’t changed, and that’s a real problem...Click here to keep reading