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Entries in Josiah Bartlett Center (157)

Saturday
Jun272015

Josiah Bartlett Center - All about the state budget 

Weekly Update from the
Josiah Bartlett Center

Keeping you up to date on our latest research
on the issues impacting New Hampshire

Ignore the Rhetoric and Give the Government a Timeout

The juvenile rhetoric that dominates so much of politics today makes it hard to sort out the looming budget veto and the issues beneath it. The first step to understanding is to ignore everything every politician says. Vetoes are not radical, the budget differences in almost but not quite all areas are tiny, and there is absolutely no chance whatsoever that New Hampshire’s government will shut down.

With a governor of one party and a legislature of the other, disagreements over policy are inevitable. But on the budget they are not particularly stark. For example, the governor hoped to increase the two-year, all-inclusive budget by 6.4% to $11.49 billion. The legislature is proposing a 5.1% increase to $11.35 billion. On each side, the Health and Human Services half of the budget would increase more than twice as fast as everything else. For example, the legislature proposes increasing HHS 8.4% and everything else by 3.2%. 
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Who Wants to Spend Where? General Fund Comparison Charts

Who wants to spend where? These chart compares the actual and adjusted spending for the current budget, to the Governor’s proposed budget, the House budget, the Senate budget, and the Committee of Conference budget.  Click here to keep take a look.

Tuesday
Jun232015

Josiah Bartlett Center - Steve Forbes and What happens if NH doesn't have a Budget? 

Weekly Update from the
Josiah Bartlett Center

Keeping you up to date on our latest research
on the issues impacting New Hampshire

Off Budget: What Happens if New Hampshire
Doesn't Have a Budget by June 30?

What happens if there is no state budget by June 30? With the Legislature and Governor at such odds on the matter, it is a distinct possibility. It would not be that unusual either. New Hampshire has resorted to temporary budget six times since the end of World War II: 1949, 1955, 1959, 1971, 1977, and 2003.

The state’s budget is not designed to be perpetual; rather it requires reauthorization every two years. As a result, the state’s legal authority to spend money expires at the end of the last day of the second fiscal year of the biennium: June 30.
 
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Why Steve Forbes is the Antidote to Modern Political Superficiality

As public policy, politics, and elections slowly degenerate into a circus aimed at playing a game, calling names, and merely attacking another person, let me offer you Steve Forbes as an example for today of what the political world ought to be about and too often isn’t. Though Forbes ran for office himself, he was and continues to be an antidote to the superficiality gradually infecting the body politic and instead works not to achieve power but to “encourage and full and reasoned discussion of the issues.” Click here to keep reading.

Saturday
Jun132015

Josiah Bartlett Center - Latest on the State Budget 

Weekly Update from the Josiah Bartlett Center

Keeping you up to date on our latest research
on the issues impacting New Hampshire

 

Don't Pay Attention to the Budget Debate, It Doesn't Matter

The state budget is a pitched battle fought tooth and nail where the warriors largely agree. Posturing and the art of a press statement are more important than information. In reality, verbally armed camps will give way to easy agreement over all but one or two differences. Vetoes, stalemates, and months of budget-less government are much less likely than annoying-but-meaningless press releases you can safely ignore. Click here to keep reading.


From the Archives: What Happens if New Hampshire
Doesn't Have a Budget by June 30?

{Author’s note: June 2015. This piece was originally written during the 2013 budget process when there was a possibility that June 30th would arrive without new budget being passed. With the possibility of a gubernatorial veto this budget cycle and all of the below still holding true (though the opponents have changed), we brought this piece from the archives}

What happens if there is no state budget by June 30? With the House and Senate at such odds on the matter, it is a distinct possibility. It would not be that unusual either. New Hampshire has resorted to temporary budget six times since the end of World War II: 1949, 1955, 1959, 1971, 1977, and 2003. Click here to keep reading.

 

Don't forget to order your Libertas Dinner tickets!
Click the invite below to order yours today!
 
 
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Saturday
Jun062015

Josiah Bartlett Center - Comparing Recoveries and Workers Compensation 

Weekly Update from the
Josiah Bartlett Center

Keeping you up to date on our latest research
on the issues impacting New Hampshire

Current Recovery Lagging Well Behind Previous Recoveries

New Hampshire has a strong track record of economic growth, especially in the 1980s, 1990s and early 2000s. This economic prowess helped give birth to the phrase “The New Hampshire Advantage” and made the state the envy of the region. Since 2002 however, the stiff wind that once filled the state’s economy’s sails has become a gentle zephyr at best. The last thirteen years in particular have seen mediocre growth in both employment and jobs. The recovery from the latest recession has been particularly slow. More than 5 years after the bottom of the recession, the state has only just recently returned to prerecession employment levels and jobs numbers. Click here to keep reading.


House 'Conservatives' Lurch into Price Controls

In the world-turned-upside-down that is the New Hampshire legislature, a group of former conservatives has been reduced to arguing that the only real fix to health care is government price controls. Concerned about the lack of competitive pressures and other market mechanisms, they have decided the best of all solutions is to simply give up and give in to price controls. A legislator in search of a grand solution that can bear his signature in bold type is easily seduced by what he would eagerly call socialism if proposed by his opponent. But we are all easily persuaded that our own idea is merely “realistic” and that my case is an exception to the usual platitudes we espouse. Click here to keep reading.

Saturday
May302015

Josiah Bartlett Center - Libertas Dinner and Charter School Funding 

The Busy Month of June

 
There is a lot going on in the world of politics and policy right now. In this weekly update I want to make sure you know some of what’s going on inside the Bartlett center and state government. The state budget is coming to a head just as we are unfolding our annual Libertas dinner (June 17).

The dinner is of course a celebration of economic opportunity and freedom, this year honoring Steve Forbes who reminds us that “free people and free markets are the best answer in today’s economy.” But as our beloved Granite State finds itself at a crossroads, these are more than just words, they are a guide to the policy solutions we face. Too often politicians even here get caught up and decide that competition and supply and demand are outdated concepts. We’re on the other side whether it be alternatives in education or using competition and market forces to better your health care.

If you care to join us June 17 we will celebrate the Bartlett Center itself and our role reminding policy makers of time honored truths. And of course it is our annual fundraiser which helps one check at a time to provide us with the resources to simply exist and do the work that so many count on. Without an endowment or a government sponsor or a large benefactor, we count proving our worth to individuals, one at a time, each and every year – the market forces we extol in so many other areas. Consider joining us. It is in fact the most enjoyable event of the year. To buy your tickets online, click on the invite below. 
 
In the meantime, feel free to peruse information on the funding crisis facing charter schools and their students as well as our continuing efforts to sound the alarm about a very mediocre economy.  
Hope to see you soon,                                            
 
Charlie            

                                 

 


Senate's Charter School Funding would be Devastating

Oddly, State Senators who claim to be supportive of charter schools are doing their best to destroy them. Perhaps charter schools would have been better off to have outright enemies in charge rather than pretend supporters whose token gestures will do more to close these alternative schools than active opposition would.

After years of apathy toward charter schools, the state Senate has signaled its intention to out-mediocre the House and offer these schools the most nominal of Band-Aids that will help the schools almost not at all but create the tiniest of fig leafs for a handful of politicians.
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