Press Releases

 

Entries in Law Enforcement (173)

Tuesday
Feb172015

MPP - News Conference and Committee Hearing re: Bill to Reduce Marijuana Penalties 

 

Supporters of Bill to Remove Criminal Penalties for Marijuana Possession in New Hampshire to Hold News Conference TODAY at 1:30 p.m. ET Prior to Committee Hearing

 

Bill sponsors will be joined by attorneys Paul Twomey and Jonathan Cohen, and Matt Simon of the Marijuana Policy Project, at event prior to House Criminal Justice and Public Safety Committee hearing on HB 618

 

CONCORD — Supporters of a bill to remove criminal penalties for possession of small amounts of marijuana in New Hampshire will hold a news conference today at 1:30 p.m. ET in the lobby of the Legislative Office Building prior to a hearing on the bill by the House Criminal Justice and Public Safety Committee.

 

The bill sponsor, Rep. Adam Schroadter (R-Newmarket), will be joined at the event by bill cosponsor Rep. Joe Lachance (R-Manchester), attorney Paul Twomey, attorney Jonathan Cohen, and Matt Simon of the Marijuana Policy Project.

 

The committee hearing isscheduled for 2:30 p.m. ET in Room 204 of the Legislative Office Building.

 

HB 618, sponsored by Rep. Schroadter and a bipartisan group of seven co-sponsors, would make possession of up to one ounce of marijuana punishable by a civil fine of up to $100. It would also make cultivation of up to six marijuana plants a Class A misdemeanor instead of a felony. Currently, possession of any amount of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to one year in prison and a fine of up to $2,000. New Hampshire is the only state in New England that treats simple marijuana possession as a criminal offense with the potential for jail time.

 

“This bill represents a big step toward more sensible marijuana policies in New Hampshire,” said Matt Simon, the Goffstown-based New England political director for the Marijuana Policy Project. “There is no reason to saddle someone with a permanent and life-altering criminal record for using a substance that is safer than alcohol.”

 

WHAT: News conference and House Criminal Justice and Public Safety Committee hearing regarding bill to remove criminal penalties for marijuana possession (HB 618)

 

WHEN: Tuesday, February 17, news conference at 1:30 p.m. ET, committee hearing at 2:30 p.m. ET

 

WHERE: News conference in lobby of the New Hampshire Legislative Office Building, 33 N. State St., Concord; committee hearing in Room 204

 

WHO: Rep. Adam Schroadter (R-Newmarket)

Rep. Joe Lachance (R-Manchester)

Paul Twomey, Esq.

Jonathan Cohen, Esq.

Matt Simon, New England political director, Marijuana Policy Project

 

# # #

 

The Marijuana Policy Project, the nation’s largest marijuana policy organization, has been responsible for changing most state-level marijuana laws since 2000. For more information, visit http://www.MarijuanaPolicy.org.

Friday
Feb132015

NHDP - Radical GOP Gun Bill Has Been Opposed by Law Enforcement, Members of Own Party 

Senator Morse and Then-Senator Gatsas Opposed 2004 Bill Eliminating Local Licensing Process to Carry Concealed Weapons
 
Concord, N.H. – Today, the New Hampshire State Senate will vote on a radical bill that would eliminate the 92-year-old local licensing process to carry concealed weapons.
 
The measure is not only opposed by the New Hampshire Association of Chiefs of Police, but has also been opposed by several prominent New Hampshire Republicans, including Senate President Chuck Morse and then-Senator Ted Gatsas, who both voted against SB 454, a comparable 2004 bill.
 
“It’s telling that on the day Governor Hassan presents her budget to lay the foundation of a new generation of economic growth, Senate Republicans are focused on repealing a 92-year-old licensing requirement for concealed weapons over the opposition of the law enforcement community,” said New Hampshire Democratic Party Press Secretary Aaron Jacobs.   
 
“Instead of fixating on this measure that the New Hampshire Association of Chiefs of Police says would hurt our public safety, Senate Republicans should join Governor Hassan in working to solve problems and get results for New Hampshire’s people, businesses, and economy,” added Jacobs.
Tuesday
Feb032015

NH LAW ENFORCEMENT TRAINERS LEARN THE LATEST ACTIVE SHOOTER TACTICS 

NEW HAMPSHIRE DEPARTMENT OF SAFETY

 

MANCHESTER, NH –Twenty-five local and state law enforcement trainers practice the latest active shooter tactics this week at the Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Response Training program sponsored by the New Hampshire Department of Safety and the New Hampshire Police Academy. 

After completing the course, the trainers will train local and state law enforcement personnel through the Police Academy and with funding support from State Homeland Security and Emergency Management. The cities of Nashua and Dover act as fiscal agents for this project and were awarded U.S. Homeland Security grants to cover the cost of the instructors.

Friday
Jan302015

MPP - Bill to Reduce Marijuana Penalties Introduced in N.H 

State Lawmakers to Consider Removing Criminal Penalties for Marijuana Possession in New Hampshire 

Bill introduced with bipartisan support would replace criminal penalties and potential jail time with a civil fine of up to $100 for possession of up to one ounce of marijuana

 

CONCORD — A bill has been introduced in the New Hampshire House of Representatives that would remove criminal penalties for possession of small amounts of marijuana. The House passed a nearly identical bill last year by a vote of 215-92, but the Senate refused to consider it. 

HB 618, sponsored by Rep. Adam Schroadter (R-Newmarket) and a bipartisan group of seven co-sponsors, would make possession of up to one ounce of marijuana punishable by a civil fine of up to $100. It would also make cultivation of up to six marijuana plants a Class A misdemeanor instead of a felony. Currently, possession of any amount of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by up to one year in prison and a fine of up to $2,000. New Hampshire is the only state in New England that treats simple marijuana possession as a criminal offense with the potential for jail time.  

"Criminalizing someone for possessing a small amount of marijuana causes far more harm than marijuana itself,” said Matt Simon, the Goffstown-based New England political director for the Marijuana Policy Project, which is supporting the bill. "A criminal record can prevent someone from accessing employment, an education, and even a home.” 

Three out of five adults in New Hampshire (61%) support removing criminal penalties for marijuana possession, according to a WMUR Granite State Poll released in April 2014. Only 24% said they were opposed. 

“Granite State voters are sick of having the harshest marijuana penalties in New England,” Simon said. “It is irrational to treat people like criminals simply for possessing a substance that is far less harmful than alcohol.” 

Nineteen states and the District of Columbia have removed the threat of jail for simple marijuana possession.

Tuesday
Oct212014

FreeKeeneNews - Cops Attack Hungry Students Long After Pumpkin Fest 2014 Riots 

VIDEO: NH Cops Arrest Students for Walking

The police state did not end after the Pumpkin Fest rioters left.  After I got off-the-air from my live Saturday radio program (on which we discussed the initial Pumpkin Fest 2014 riots), I headed back down to the college. At the time, there was a helicopter broadcasting a message to disperse or be arrested. I arrived at the gateway to Keene State College – Winchester St. to witness a huge throng of police marching down the street. I quickly pulled out my camera and began to record (click for video).

After walking around the nearest building on campus, in full view of the line of police, activists walked onto campus and right back over to Winchester St.  We continued walking west on Winchester and no cops said anything to us there.  However, we again went on campus and came back out on Madison St., on the west end of the college.  Here there were several police standing around the intersection and one of them told me we couldn’t pass, despite college students walking down Winchester St. immediately behind them.
 

The solution was simply to walk 30 feet south and cut through the parking lot, back to Winchester St., wherein we were easily able to walk right past the same officers moments later.

What the hell was the point of these chokepoints anyway?  The riots had been over for a while by now.  It seemed the police were just enforcing arbitrary lines, and not very effectively or consistently.  After checking out the police staging area, which the BEARCAT never actually left (thankfully), we came back to Winchester and Madison, where a very large group of armored and other police had gathered despite nothing at all happening there.  It appeared they were preparing for transport elsewhere, however, before they could take off, three guys walked up from the dorms in search of late-night eats at the Campus Convenience store on the southeast corner.

Despite them being in the exact same place I was just minutes earlier, these young men were told to “GO HOME!” over and over with the demand being shouted by multiple officers.  Within moments, the officers swarmed and attacked the guys (jump right to that part of the video), who had stated they were hungry.  Did the officers behave differently toward them than they did me because there were more of the police present when the guys walked up?

This action by the police, like the arrest of the guy walking down the sidewalk earlier in the day, was completely unnecessary and outrageous.  These guys wanted some munchies, not to eat pavement.  They had not hurt anyone and had not threatened anyone.  This is pure escalation.  Not long after, city boss John MacLean and police chief Ken Meola are seen laughing it up across the street, ironically in front of “Alpha Dogs” eatery.

Stay tuned to Free Keene for the latest on the Pumpkin Fest 2014 Riots.


Feel free to get in touch with me if you have questions or would like to interview an activist,
Ian Freeman
Blogger, FreeKeene.com