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Entries in Legislation (141)

Thursday
Jan012015

NH Senate Republicans - Stiles Resolves to Finish Hampton Seawall in 2015 

The New Hampshire Senate

Republican Majority Office

 

Hampton, NH – Senator Nancy Stiles (R-Hampton) today congratulated the NH Department of Resources and Economic Development for making great progress on the Hampton North Beach Seawall Project this year, and looked forward to the Seawall’s completion in 2015. 

Crews from DRED’s Division of Parks and Recreation have halted work on the $4.7 million reconstruction project for the winter, but anticipate finishing the work early next year. Stiles has worked for years to make repair of the Seawall a top priority, and a recent winter storm proved how critical it was to complete the project. 

“I’m pleased that reconstruction of the Hampton Seawall will finally be completed in 2015,” Stiles said. “This project is not only important for public safety, but keeping Ocean Boulevard open is vital to the local and regional economy.” 

DRED Parks Director Phillip Bryce says depending on the weather, crews could be back to work as early as March, and plan on completing the Seawall Project by June 15th. DRED has responsibility to maintain the 12-foot high Seawall, which was first built in the 1930’s. This project marks the first major repairs on the North Beach Seawall since then. 

“We greatly appreciate the support of the Legislature, and especially the support and leadership of Senator Stiles, so we could finish the project in 2015,” Bryce added. “As a result, we were able to save over a million dollars.” 

A 140-foot section of the seawall was severely damaged in December 2012, leaving Ocean Boulevard vulnerable to flooding and storm surge. Stiles authored an amendment to the 2013 Capital Budget to secure $4.7 million to complete repairs, half coming from the Capital Budget itself and the other half coming from revenues from parking meters on Hampton Beach.

 

 

Wednesday
Jun182014

House Republican Alliance Releases Legislative Scorecard

Today, the House Republican Alliance (HRA) released its 2014 scorecard for members of the New Hampshire House.  The HRA scorecard ranks every state representative's voting record according to how well their votes comply with the U.S and N.H.  Constitution, the New Hampshire Republican Platform, and fiscal soundness. The rating is determined by comparing each representative's voting record with the recommendations HRA published in the "Pink Sheet”. HRA's Pink Sheet recommendations are distributed to House members before each session and are available on the HRA website. 

This scorecard was derived from 118 roll call votes. This year, on average, 83.3% of Republican voted in line with HRA recommendations.  The Democrats' average was 9.6%, which dramatically demonstrates how different the parties are in their respective ideologies.

The HRA scorecard is the longest running scorecard or measurement used in the New Hampshire House of Representatives.  A summary of each bill's impact is available at www.NHHRA.org.

The HRA is the oldest independent policy group in the NH House, consisting of current and recent New Hampshire House members who work together to advance fiscal sanity and Republican principles of smaller government and keeping taxes low for all citizens of the state.

Saturday
May312014

Josiah Bartlett Center - Sausage Making, the Rainy Day Fund, and Narrow Networks 

Weekly Update from the
Josiah Bartlett Center

Keeping you up to date on our latest research
on the issues impacting New Hampshire
 

The most annoying and disheartening time of the legislative year is upon us – the time when transparency and honest debate are sacrificed on the altar of hidden agendas in pursuit of that elusive legislative pot of gold, “a deal.” Committees of conference are legislative mini-summits where the romanticized version of a smoke filled room creates comparisons to sausage making that do a distinct dishonor the noble smoked meats. Click here to keep reading
 


Summary: The current FY14-15 budget spends $30.5 million more on Health and Human Services than the House Budget proposed, when Uncompensated Care is removed. Revenue projections for the Medicaid Enhancement Tax (MET), which funds Uncompensated Care, were revised downwards in the Enacted Budget on the advice of HHS. Taking into account all back of the budget reductions, the Enacted Budget spends nearly $23.5 million more over the biennium than the House Budget in General Funds. Click here to keep reading

 


The real problem with the Obamacare network in New Hampshire is not that it is too narrow but that there is any network at all. Healthcare costs are lowered not when the one government sanctioned picks winners and losers but instead when providers compete for the customer pool. The oddly constructed health exchange in New Hampshire is not the beginning of the future but the last gasp of the past. Click here to keep reading

 

Thursday
May292014

MPP - NH Med. Marijuana Rules Hearing Thursday 

 

Medical Marijuana Patients and Advocates to Comment on Proposed Patient Registry Rules at Public Hearing Thursday                                                                    

Advocates will urge regulators to more swiftly implement program that will provide seriously ill patients with legal access to medical marijuana; hearing will take place at the Department of Health and Human Services Brown Building Auditorium at 9:30 a.m. ET                                                              

CONCORD — The Department of Health and Human Services is scheduled to hold a public hearing Thursday on its proposed rules for the patient registry portion of the state’s medical marijuana program. Patients and advocates will comment on the draft rules (available here) and the impact of a memo from the attorney general’s office (available here) that has delayed implementation of the program. 

The Marijuana Policy Project is urging regulators to begin issuing ID cards to patients as quickly as possible. 

“It is critical that the state begin issuing ID cards to patients as soon as the rules for the patient registry have been finalized,” said Matt Simon, a Goffstown-based New England Political Director for the Marijuana Policy Project. “There is no reason to delay the program, and many patients can’t afford to wait any longer for relief. Our state should not continue to criminalize seriously ill people who are using medical marijuana under their doctors’ supervision.”

 

WHAT: Public hearing on proposed rules for the patient registry portion of the Therapeutic Use of Cannabis program

 

WHEN: Thursday, May 29, 9:30 a.m. ET

 

WHERE: Department of Health and Human Services, Brown Building Auditorium, 129 Pleasant Street, Concord

 

WHO: Matt Simon, New England Political Director for the Marijuana Policy Project

 

# # #

 

The Marijuana Policy Project, the nation’s largest marijuana policy organization, has been responsible for changing most state-level marijuana laws since 2000. For more information, visit http://www.MarijuanaPolicy.org.

Friday
May162014

NHDP - ICYMI: Senate Republicans Killed Bipartisan Energy Bill Because “Scott Brown Asked Them To” 

Key Point: “The reason Senate Republicans decided to fracture the coalition for an energy bill everybody seemed to like, Sabrina Siddiqui and Ryan Grim report, is that Scott Brown asked them to. Brown is running against Shaheen this November, and Republicans — especially would-be Majority leader Mitch McConnell — want Brown to beat Shaheen because they want to win a majority.  Brown needs to deprive Shaheen of the afterglow that would come from shepherding a (now rare) bipartisan bill through Congress. And, indeed, when Senate Republicans killed Shaheen’s bill, the New Hampshire Republican Party immediately highlighted its failure to attack her.”

 
New York MagazineHow Mitch McConnell Hacked American Politics

By Jonathan Chait 

For more than three years, Democratic Senator Jeanne Shaheen and Republican Senator Rob Portman have been cooperating on a bill to improve energy efficiency standards. They carefully assembled a wide coalition, ranging from conservative business lobbies to liberal environmentalists, and trimmed away any remotely controversial provisions, leaving a series of modest-size but worthy reforms that helped business save money by reducing energy use. It appeared headed for passage, and even had bipartisan House sponsors. Then Monday the bill suddenly died. It died for reasons that were initially mysterious, but which turn out to clarify not only the legislation’s fate but the broader reason why national politics, in the form Americans wish it to exist, is dead and can never return.

The proximate cause of the legislation’s demise was the demand by Republican Senators to hold votes on controversial amendments on issues like approving the Keystone pipeline and preventing new regulations on power plants. Obviously, attaching divisive amendments to a bill that was painstakingly written to avoid controversy is going to fracture its coalition, and so it did. The reason Senate Republicans decided to fracture the coalition for an energy bill everybody seemed to 
like, Sabrina Siddiqui and Ryan Grim report, is that Scott Brown asked them to. Brown is running against Shaheen this November, and Republicans — especially would-be Majority leader Mitch McConnell — want Brown to beat Shaheen because they want to win a majority.

Brown needs to deprive Shaheen of the afterglow that would come from shepherding a (now rare) bipartisan bill through Congress. And, indeed, when Senate Republicans killed Shaheen’s bill, the New Hampshire Republican Party immediately highlighted its failure to attack her:

Senator Shaheen has called the Shaheen-Portman Energy Efficiency Bill her 'defining' legislation. But after its defeat, Senator Shaheen doesn't have a single legislative accomplishment to run on as she seeks re-election. It's time to end Jeanne Shaheen's failed tenure in the Senate and replace her with a responsible Republican who can get results for New Hampshire.

For a voter paying close attention to the Senate’s machinations, this makes little sense: Republicans are arguing that their torpedoing of Shaheen’s bill proves Shaheen is a legislative failure. But few voters follow politics so closely, and even those reading detailed coverage of the bill’s failure would quickly get lost in an arcane procedural dispute that putatively caused its demise.