Press Releases

 

Entries in NH DHHS (638)

Saturday
Sep062014

NH DHHS - “Suicide Prevention: IT (Information Technology) Makes A Difference

Concord, NH – Suicide continues to be a very serious issue in New

Hampshire; it’s the second leading cause of death for youth and young

adults ages 15 – 34 and the fourth leading cause of death for people ages

35 – 54. Increasingly, technology of all kinds is being utilized in

prevention and screening for suicide risk. On Monday, September 8th the New

Hampshire Suicide Prevention Council will be highlighting the various types

of “IT” and how they are being used to aid in suicide prevention, including

electronic medical records, interactive training videos and cell phone

apps.



This is a unique opportunity to hear about how technology has changed the

efforts towards the prevention of suicide.



Speakers for this event include:

Dr. Daniel Potenza, Psychiatric Medical Director, New Hampshire Department

of Corrections and Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Dartmouth

Medical School.

Dr. P. Travis Harker, Family Physician, Concord Hospital Family Health

Center

Staff Sergeant Dana Osborne, State Resilience Coordinator, New Hampshire

National Guard

Jennifer Schirmer, Disaster Behavioral Health Coordinator, Emergency

Services Unit, New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services

JoAn Morin, Hotline Coordinator, Headrest, Agency that answers

1-800-273-TALK in NH



DATE September 8, 2014

9:00 AM



EVENT Technology uses for Suicide Prevention





LOCATION Legislative Office Building

Lobby

Concord, NH

Friday
Sep052014

NH DHHS - Identifies Positive Test for EEE in an Animal

Finding Leads to Increase in Risk Level

Concord, NH - The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services

(DHHS) is today announcing a positive test result for Eastern Equine

Encephalitis (EEE) in a mule in the town of Candia. This finding raises

the risk level for human illness in Candia from “Moderate” to “High.” The

surrounding towns of Auburn, Chester, Hooksett, and Raymond will be

increased from “Low” to “Moderate” risk.



“This is the first animal in New Hampshire to test positive for EEE this

season,” said DHHS Public Health Director Dr. José Montero. “This is

another indicator that there are EEE virus and West Nile Virus infected

mosquitoes in the State. The end of August through mid-October is the time

that people are at the greatest risk for contracting a mosquito-borne

disease. It is so important for everyone in the State, no matter where you

live, to take simple precautions to prevent being bitten by mosquitoes.”



So far this season New Hampshire’s Public Health Lab has tested 2,908

batches of mosquitoes. Of those, 6 tested positive for EEE and none have

tested positive for West Nile Virus (WNV). Additionally, one person was

diagnosed with EEE virus infection in August.



EEE is a serious disease that carries a high mortality rate for those who

contract the serious encephalitis form of the illness. Symptoms may

include high fever, severe headache, and stiff neck. There is no treatment

for the disease, which can lead to seizures and coma. Symptoms usually

occur 4 to 10 days after being bitten. Symptoms of WNV disease often

appear 4 to 10 days after being bitten. If you or someone you know is

experiencing flu-like symptoms, including fever and headache, contact your

local medical provider.



Protect yourself and your family from WNV and EEE with these simple steps:

· Use an effective mosquito repellant when you’re outside

· Wear long sleeves and pants at dawn and dusk when mosquitoes are most

active

· Remove standing water from around your home so mosquitoes do not have

a place to breed

· Check doors and windows to ensure screens are in place and in good

condition to prevent mosquitoes from entering your home



For more information about EEE and West Nile Virus visit the DHHS website

at http://www.dhhs.nh.gov/dphs/cdcs/arboviral/index.htm and the Centers for

Disease Control and Prevention website at www.cdc.gov . For questions

contact the DHHS Bureau of Infectious Disease Control at 603-271-4496.





Prevention Guidelines for West Nile Virus and

Eastern Equine Encephalitis

NH Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Public Health



Services





1. Eliminate standing water and other mosquito breeding locations.

In warm weather, mosquitoes can breed in any puddle that lasts more than 4

days!

· Remove old tires from your property.

· Dispose of tin cans, plastic containers, ceramic pots, or other

containers. Don’t overlook containers that have become overgrown

by aquatic vegetation.

· Drill holes in the bottom of recycling containers that are left

outside.

· Make sure roof gutters are clean and draining properly.

· Clean and chlorinate swimming pools and hot tubs. If not in use,

keep empty and covered and keep covers free of standing water.

· Aerate garden ponds or stock them with fish.

· Turn over wheelbarrows and change water in birdbaths at least

twice weekly.

· Turn over plastic wading pools when not in use.

· Remind or help neighbors to eliminate breeding sites on their

properties.



2. Be aware of where mosquitoes live and breed and keep them from entering

your home.

· Mosquitoes lay their eggs in standing water. Weeds, tall grass, and

bushes provide an outdoor home for adult mosquitoes, including

several species commonly associated with West Nile virus and eastern

equine encephalitis.

· Mosquitoes can enter homes through unscreened windows or doors, or

broken screens. Make sure that doors and windows have tight-fitting

screens. Repair or replace all screens in your home that have tears

or holes.

· Resting mosquitoes can often be flushed from indoor resting sites by

using sweeping motions under beds, behind bedside tables etc. and

once in flight, exterminated prior to sleeping at night.



3. Protect yourself from mosquito bites.

· If outside during evening, nighttime, and dawn hours when mosquitoes

are most active and likely to bite, children and adults should wear

protective clothing such as long pants, long-sleeved shirts, and

socks.

· Consider the use of an effective insect repellent, such as one

containing DEET. A repellent containing 30% or less DEET

(N,N-diethyl-methyl-meta-toluamide) for children and adults. Use DEET

according to the manufacturer's directions. Children should not apply

DEET to themselves. Repellents that contain Picaridin,

para-menthane-diol or oil of lemon eucalyptus have also been

determined to be effective.

· Vitamin B, ultrasonic devices, incense, and bug zappers have not been

shown to be effective in preventing mosquito bites.





For more information on West Nile Virus or Eastern Equine Encephalitis,

call the NH Department of Health and Human Services toll-free West Nile

Virus Information Line at 1-866–273–NILE (6543), or visit the West Nile

Virus Website at www.dhhs.nh.gov

Sunday
Aug242014

NH DHHS Provides Update on Nut Butter

Concord, NH - The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services

(DHHS), Division of Public Health Services (DPHS) announces nSpired Natural

Foods, Inc. is voluntarily recalling certain lots of its nut butter

products. The lots include Arrowhead Mills® Peanut Butters, MaraNatha®

Almond Butters and Peanut Butters and specific private label nut butters

packaged in glass and plastic jars because they have the potential to be

contaminated with Salmonella. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDS)

alerted the Company to the potential risk following routine testing.

nSpired Natural Foods, Inc has received reports of four illnesses that may

be associated with these specific products. No cases of Salmonella linked

to this outbreak have been identified in New Hampshire.



"Since the range of products is broad and nut butters have a long shelf

life it’s important that people check their cupboards to see if they may

have some of this product at home," said NH Public Health Director Dr. Jose

Montero. "Most people recover from salmonellosis, but it has serious

implications for young children especially, who are also the most likely to

consume peanut butter products."



nSpired Natural Foods, Inc is working with consumers to remove them from

their homes, and retailers to remove and destroy the products from store

shelves and warehouses.



Products were distributed across the US, Canada, Hong Kong, United Arab

Emirates, and Dominican Republic. The products were also sold over the

internet. Consumers do not need to return the product; instead they are

urged to dispose of the recalled product and its container. Contact

nSpired Natural Foods, Inc at 1-800-937-7008 for a replacement, refund or

for general inquiries.



Salmonella is a bacterium that can cause serious and sometimes fatal

infections in young children, frail or elderly people and those with

weakened immune systems. Healthy people infected with Salmonella often

experience fever, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. Some

cases may be more severe and may require hospitalization.



Consumers are advised to check the FDA website at

www.fda.gov/Food/default.htm  for updates on this recall and for a complete

list of the recalled products. Anyone with questions about salmonellosis

can call DPHS' Bureau of Infectious Disease Control at 603-271-4496.

Saturday
Aug232014

NH DHHS Announces First Human Case of EEE This Season

Concord, NH – The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services

(DHHS) is announcing the first human case of Eastern Equine Encephalitis

(EEE) this season in an adult from Conway. The most recent previous human

case of EEE in New Hampshire was confirmed in 2009. Also four additional

mosquito batches were found to be positive in New Hampshire today; two in

Derry and two in Candia. Three of these batches were bird biting mosquitoes

indicating an increase in EEE activity in the bird population. One of the

batches was a mammal biting species which increases the risk of additional

human or veterinary cases of EEE. This brings the total of EEE mosquito

batches identified this season to five. There have been no West Nile Virus

positives yet this year.



In 2013, there were 27 positives for EEE, including 24 mosquito batches and

3 animals. EEE and WNV are transmitted by the bite of infected mosquitos.

This human finding will change the arboviral risk map for Conway to high

and the surrounding municipalities of Chatham, Bartlett, Hales Location,

Albany, Madison, and Eaton to moderate. The risk level in Derry will remain

at moderate. The risk level for Candia will increase to moderate.



“This positive is at about the same time as the previous EEE patient

identified in 2009,” said NH Public Health Director Dr. José Montero.

“There is no way to know where exactly this individual was infected, but we

do know that both of these diseases are present in New Hampshire so it is

important that everyone remember to take steps to prevent mosquito bites to

themselves and their loved ones.”



Symptoms of EEE disease often appear 4 to 10 days after being bitten. If

you or someone you know is experiencing flu-like symptoms, including fever

and headache, contact your local medical provider. EEE is a more serious

disease than WNV and carries a high mortality rate for those who contract

the serious encephalitis form of the illness. Symptoms may include high

fever, severe headache, stiff neck, and sore throat. There is no specific

treatment for the disease, which can lead to seizures and coma.



You can protect yourself and your family from WNV and EEE with a few simple

steps, such as using effective mosquito repellant, wearing long sleeves and

pants at dawn and dusk when mosquitoes are most active, removing standing

water from around your house so mosquitoes do not have a place to breed,

and by checking doors and windows to ensure screens are in place and in

good condition to prevent mosquitoes from entering your home.



For more information about EEE and West Nile Virus visit the DHHS website

at http://www.dhhs.nh.gov/dphs/cdcs/arboviral/index.htm and the Centers for

Disease Control and Prevention website at www.cdc.gov . For questions

contact the DHHS Bureau of Infectious Disease Control at 603-271-4496.

# # #


Prevention Guidelines for West Nile Virus and

Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus

NH Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Public Health



Services





1. Eliminate standing water and other mosquito breeding locations.

In warm weather, mosquitoes can breed in any puddle that lasts more than 4

days!

· Remove old tires from your property.

· Dispose of tin cans, plastic containers, ceramic pots, or other

containers. Don’t overlook containers that have become overgrown

by aquatic vegetation.

· Drill holes in the bottom of recycling containers that are left

outside.

· Make sure roof gutters are clean and draining properly.

· Clean and chlorinate swimming pools and hot tubs. If not in use,

keep empty and covered and keep covers free of standing water.

· Aerate garden ponds or stock them with fish.

· Turn over wheelbarrows and change water in birdbaths at least

twice weekly.

· Turn over plastic wading pools when not in use.

· Remind or help neighbors to eliminate breeding sites on their

properties.



2. Be aware of where mosquitoes live and breed and keep them from entering

your home.

· Mosquitoes lay their eggs in standing water. Weeds, tall grass, and

bushes provide an outdoor home for adult mosquitoes, including

several species commonly associated with West Nile Virus and Eastern

Equine Encephalitis Virus.

· Mosquitoes can enter homes through unscreened windows or doors, or

broken screens. Make sure that doors and windows have tight-fitting

screens. Repair or replace all screens in your home that have tears

or holes.

· Resting mosquitoes can often be flushed from indoor resting sites by

using sweeping motions under beds, behind bedside tables etc. and

once in flight, exterminated prior to sleeping at night.



3. Protect yourself from mosquito bites.

· If outside during evening, nighttime, and dawn hours when mosquitoes

are most active and likely to bite, children and adults should wear

protective clothing such as long pants, long-sleeved shirts, and

socks.

· Consider the use of an effective insect repellent, such as one

containing DEET. A repellent containing 30% or less DEET

(N,N-diethyl-methyl-meta-toluamide) for children and adults. Use DEET

according to the manufacturer's directions. Children should not apply

DEET to themselves. Repellents that contain Picaridin or oil of lemon

eucalyptus have also been determined to be effective.

· Vitamin B, ultrasonic devices, incense, and bug zappers have not been

shown to be effective in preventing mosquito bites.





For more information on West Nile Virus or Eastern Equine Encephalitis

Virus, call the NH Department of Health and Human Services toll-free West

Nile Virus Information Line at

866–273–NILE (6543), or visit the West Nile Virus Website at

www.dhhs.nh.gov .

Friday
Aug222014

NH DHHS - Health Department and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Give Third Annual Immunization Champion Award

Concord, NH - The Immunization Program in the Division of Public Health

Services at the New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services

(DHHS) celebrates the third New Hampshire Childhood Immunization Champion,

Dr. Everett Lamm. He is a pediatrician at Core Pediatrics in Exeter, New

Hampshire.



The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Childhood Immunization

Champion Award is an annual award given jointly by the CDC Foundation and

CDC to recognize individuals who are doing an exemplary job or going above

and beyond to promote or foster childhood immunizations in their

communities.



Dr. Lamm is a respected pediatrician and vaccine advocate who has worked

tirelessly to immunize his patients and spread the word about the

importance of vaccinations. Dr. Lamm is a sought after speaker who has been

educating parents, educators and healthcare providers through conferences,

community forums and panels for years. He also serves on the New Hampshire

Immunization Advisory Committee and the New Hampshire Vaccine Association.

He is always working to dispel fear and misunderstanding about vaccines to

parents, grandparents, teachers, aunts, uncles, and caregivers.



“It is an honor to receive this prestigious award as New Hampshire leads

the nation in immunizing children.” said Lamm, “My colleagues and I work

hard to immunize all of our patients to reduce their risks of getting

disease. Talking with families about vaccines is always time well spent.”



“It is dedicated physicians such as Dr. Lamm on the front lines of patient

health who make New Hampshire’s state-wide immunization program a success,”

said Dr. José Montero, Public Health Director at DHHS. “We are grateful for

his creative thinking and willingness to be a role model and spokesperson.

His hard work and dedication are a tremendous asset to the greater Exeter

region and the State.”





For more information about the Childhood Immunization Champion Award, go to

www.cdc.gov/vaccines/events/niiw/champions/index.html. For more information

about immunizations in New Hampshire, contact the DHHS Immunization Program

at 603-271-4482 or visit the DHHS website at

www.dhhs.nh.gov/dphs/immunization/index.htm




L to R in photo: Marcella Bobinsky, NH DHHS Immunization Section Chief; Dr.

Everett Lamm, Pediatrician, Core Pediatrics Exeter; Dr. Jose Montero, NH

Public Health Director

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