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Entries in NH Sen Bradley (62)

Saturday
Jul112015

NH Sen Bradley praises support of workers’ comp reform 

CONCORD, NH – A critical bill aimed at reducing the cost of workers’ compensation was signed into law this week.

 

Senate Majority Leader Jeb Bradley (R-Wolfeboro), prime sponsor of the bill, released the following statement on SB 133 becoming law.

 

“New Hampshire businesses are burdened by high energy costs, high business taxes and high workers’ compensation costs which have continued to stifle job and economic growth in our state.  This legislation, SB 133, is the first workers compensation reform measure that has passed in years, and takes a significant step towards reforming and reducing the high cost of workers’ comp borne by our state’s small business owners,” said Senate Majority Leader Jeb Bradley (R-Wolfeboro).

 

“We need to keep working to address the high cost of doing business in New Hampshire by reducing business taxes, health care costs, and energy costs as part of a multi-faceted approach to restoring business competitiveness.”

 

Chapter 210: SB 133-FN—Final Version

 

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Friday
Jul102015

NH Senators Bradley, Feltes praise passage of bill to protect energy ratepayers 

Concord, NH – Today, Governor Maggie Hassan signed SB 221 into law. This bill would allow Eversource (formerly PSNH) to sell off its power generating assets while limiting the costs passed on to New Hampshire’s ratepayers.

Senate Majority Leader Jeb Bradley (R-Wolfeboro) and Senator Dan Feltes (D-Concord) released statements following the signing of SB 221 into law.

“This legislation works to protect New Hampshire PSNH’s electric customers by ensuring they will see lower rates and those PSNH shareholders will bear some of the burden of stranded costs incurred by the Merrimack Station Scrubber. I am glad to see this important measure become law and thank Meredith Hatfield of the Governor’s Energy Office and the other members of the State Team that negotiated the Settlement with PSNH and also worked to see this legislation pass,” Said Senate Majority Leader Jeb Bradley (R-Wolfeboro).

 “This legislation helps us complete the transition to a competitive energy marketplace in New Hampshire, while balancing the interests of all ratepayer classes, municipalities, and workers,” said Senator Dan Feltes (D-Concord). “Signing SB 221 into law is a significant step to reduce energy costs, provide certainty in the energy market, and help move the Granite State economy forward for everyone.  We really appreciate all the time, work and effort that Meredith Hatfield and other members of the State Team put in to make this happen."

Tuesday
Jul072015

NH Sen Bradley disappointed in Governor’s veto of SB 116 Concealed Carry

Concord, NH – Today, Governor Maggie Hassan vetoed SB 116, a bill that would have eliminated the license requirement to conceal firearms. 

Senate Majority Leader and the bill’s prime sponsor, Senator Jeb Bradley (R-Wolfeboro) released a statement following the Governor’s veto.

“I am disappointed in Governor Hassan’s veto of  SB 116, which was a common sense measure supported by the House and the Senate that would have ensured law-abiding citizens’ rights to protect their lives, liberties, and loved ones by removing the state’s conceal carry licensing requirement,” said Senator Jeb Bradley (R-Wolfeboro).

“For over 200 years Vermont has allowed its citizens who are legally able to own a firearm to also carry a concealed weapon without having to seek a permit first. Vermont has the distinction of being the nation’s safest state according to the FBI.”

 

The Governor’s veto of this measure makes no sense from a public safety perspective and undermines constitutional protections law abiding NH citizens expect,” Bradley added.

Thursday
Jun112015

NH Sen's Bradley, Feltes statement on Eversource settlement filing  

New Hampshire Senate
News Release

Concord, NH – A Settlement agreement was filed with the New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission (PUC) today that would allow Eversource (formerly PSNH) to sell off its power generating assets while lowering energy costs for customers who have remained with Eversource.

 

Senate Majority Leader Jeb Bradley (R-Wolfeboro) and Senator Dan Feltes (D-Concord) released the following statements after the filing.

 

“After months of regular discussions between various stakeholders, an agreement has been reached and a settlement was filed with the PUC that would require Eversource to sell off its remaining generating assets,” said Senate Majority Leader Jeb Bradley (R-Wolfeboro).

“New Hampshire ratepayers face some of the highest electric rates in the country and it was important to come to an agreement where customers who have remained Eversource Energy Customers would be protected from paying the full amount of stranded costs. We’ve achieved this balance and also provided rate stability for other Eversource customers throughout this transition,” continued Bradley.

 

“This bi-partisan, comprehensive settlement is likely to yield about $380 million in customer savings over the next five years, helping the Granite State economy. In moving to competition, the settlement protects and reasonably balances the interests of all Eversource ratepayers, of Eversource workers, and our communities,” said Senator Dan Feltes (D-Concord).

 

“Filing this settlement is a major step towards securing a positive and fair outcome that prepares New Hampshire for a more competitive energy future. We look forward to continuing our work on this matter, and we thank all of those who have worked hard to get us to this point,” added Feltes.

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Sunday
May172015

NH Charter Schools - Senate votes to table HB563 putting more schools at risk

May 15, 2015

Dear charter school parents,

 

We regret to inform you that yesterday the New Hampshire State Senate voted to table the charter school funding bill HB563. I know that many of you have questions and I will do my best to answer them.

  

What Happened?

The Senate initially voted to support HB563 which would have kept the bill alive and moved it to the senate finance committee. After the initial vote however Senator Bradley moved to table the bill. That vote passed so the bill will not move forward and is effectively dead.

 

But I thought the Senate Supported Charter Schools?

So did we. A number of bills that passed the House with strong bipartisan support have languished or died in the senate this year.

 

What's Next?

Schools will start closing next year unless the Senate joins with the House to update the funding formula.

 

1 - The Senate could decide to include HB563's language in their version of the budget.

 

2 - The Senate could agree to the House version of the budget.

 

3 - The Senate may decide to hold increased funding hostage for concessions from the House during budget negotiations.

 

What can I do as a parent?

Stay involved and hold legislators accountable for their votes. Republicans are in charge in the Senate and it is up to them to make this right.

 

Background on HB563

 

HB563 as amended would provide a modest $36 dollar increase in the first year (this is not a typo) and update the funding formula to increase per pupil aid by $1,000 starting in year two of the budget. Per pupil aid for charters has remained flat since 2009 and these schools are at risk.
 

"Publicity is justly commended as a remedy for social and industrial diseases. Sunlight is said to be the best of disinfectants"  Justice Louis D. Brandeis

 

BACKGROUND - HOUSE VOTES TO SUPPORT PUBLIC SCHOOLS

The New Hampshire House of Representatives voted 222-116 to support increased funding for public charter schools. All but five republicans voteds in support of HB563 joined by twenty eight democrats.

 

Emotion overcame decorum as parents and students cheered as the vote was announced.

 

Background
NH public charter schools are currently the lowest funded charter schools in the nation receiving about $5,500 per pupil or about 38% of the state average cost per pupil. NH charter schools receive $3,500 in state adequacy plus a $2,000 stipend to represent disparity aid because NH public charters do not currently benefit directly from local tax dollars.