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Entries in Peterborough (6)

Thursday
Mar272014

Fred Karger - FRED - World Premiere Set for April 4th in New Hampshire 

Will be Feature Film Opening Night at MONiff Film Festival

PETERBOROUGH, NEW HAMPSHIRE -- FRED, the brand new documentary by John Fitzgerald Keitel will have its World Premiere on Friday, April 4, 2014 as the opening night feature film at MONiff International Film Festival in Peterborough, New Hampshire.

"Four years ago this month, I began my campaign for President of the United States as the first openly gay candidate to run from either major political party," said Fred Karger. "We began our historic campaign with a family brunch at Cantine in beautiful Peterborough.  Now, four years later, we've come full circle with FRED."

The World Premiere of FRED will be held at at 6:30 pm in the Peterborough Players Theater, 55 Hadley Rd, Peterborough, NH (603) 924-9344.  Following the film, there will be a question and answer session with Fred Karger, Filmmaker John Fitzgerald Keitel and former campaign Political Director Kevin Miniter.

There will be a Pre-premiere reception at 5:00 pm the Sharon Arts Gallery, 30 Grove St., Peterborough, NH  (603) 924-7676

Watch the trailer for FRED - CLICK BELOW



Check out MONiff web site:  CLICK HERE

Check out the FRED facebook page:  CLICK HERE

FRED will play again during the closing weekend of MONiff on Saturday, April 12, 2014 at 10:00 am in the Putnam Theater, Keene State University, Keene, NH. That screening will also be followed by Q & A session.  Check on www.moniff.org for all schedule details.

John Keitel, Fred Karger and Kevin Miniter will be participating in additional screenings of FRED all over New Hampshire from Saturday, April 5 to Friday, April 11, 2014. 

For questions or if you know of an organization that would like to arrange a screening during that week, contact Kevin Miniter: kevin@fredkarger.com

Synopsis: 

2014, USA, 58 minutes
Director: John Fitzgerald Keitel

When Fred Karger began running for President of the United States in February 2010 filmmaker John Fitzgerald Keitel was at his side. John spent the next two years documenting his historic campaign as the first openly gay candidate for president from either major political party. Now a one hour documentary, FRED is out and gives audiences an inside look at the roller coaster campaign. Follow Fred from the towns of New Hampshire to the Iowa State Fair.  Watch as he takes on Fox News and Mitt Romney. See the reaction from voters to any openly gay GOP candidate as the campaign travels from New Orleans to New York, from Gay Pride Parades to the Southern Republican Leadership Conference. Watch Fred as he fights for inclusion in the debates, takes on his opponents and campaigns to let lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender Americans know that anything is possible. It’s an hour of history that will make you laugh, cry and guaranteed to delight all audiences.

Here's the movie poster:

 

We will be announcing additional New Hampshire screening dates and locations on our facebook page:  CLICK HERE
 
In the meantime, enjoy the trailer and please post and share it with your friends.
 
All the best,
Saturday
Jun292013

Motion to Intervene Filed by Durham, Northfield, Peterborough, and Salem in LGC v. Bureau of Security Regulation Case Denied by NH Supreme Court

6/28/13

On Friday of this week, the towns of Durham, Northfield, Peterborough, and Salem learned that the NH Supreme Court had denied their motion to intervene relative to the Local Government Center (LGC) V. NH Bureau of Securities Regulation case.  The Supreme Court also denied their motion to stay. 

It is believed the Supreme Court felt the aggrieved towns had alternative remedies, namely action in Superior Court. This was in fact argued by the Bureau of Securities Regulation in its brief to the court regarding the towns' complaint.  

Durham Town Administrator Todd Selig states, "This circumstance was envisioned by us as a possibility from the start and with the decision by the Supreme Court now in hand, Durham, Salem, Peterborough, and Northfield, on behalf of a larger coalition of similarly situated aggrieved communities, are actively evaluating a Superior Court action that would include a request for injunctive relief."  The City of Concord is also evaluating similar action.

"With respect, we’re disappointed with the Supreme Court’s decision,  but view it as representing a clear directive to proceed to Superior Court if we desire to argue our case on behalf of local taxpayers," states Selig. 

In terms of the history regarding this issue, the towns of Durham, Northfield, Peterborough, and Salem, on behalf of a coalition of fourteen municipalities (Auburn, Bennington, Canaan, Durham, Greenfield, Henniker, Lyndeborough, Meredith, Northfield, Peterborough, Plainfield, Raymond, Salem and Temple), filed a complaint with the NH Bureau of Securities Regulation in December 2012 regarding the return of surplus methodology adopted by the Local Government Center.  

The Bureau of Securities Regulation (BSR) found wrongdoing in the management of the Local Government Center’s risk pools. It ordered millions of dollars held by the Local Government Center (LGC) to be returned to current members of the pools.

Selig states, "The BSR, however, did not distinguish among members. Some joined the risk pools early or late, some left early or late, and some joined, left, and later rejoined. By ordering the money returned to current members, it created windfalls for some, but inadequate recompense for others. That is, some members will receive an arbitrarily larger share than their contribution, and some an arbitrarily smaller share.  This situation is inherently inequitable as contributions made to the LGC by the aggrieved towns, contributions which were later found by the BSR to be in excess of that required for insurance purposes and illegally withheld by the LGC, will in effect be returned to other communities." 

To fix this, the four towns petitioned the NH Supreme Court in January of this year to allow them to intervene, and to address the hearings officer’s failure to fashion a remedy that will allow refunds in proportion to members’ contributions. Due to the dates they joined and left, these four towns – Durham, Northfield, Peterborough, and Salem – believe they represent all members whose share of the refund will be inadequate compared to the share of the money they contributed.

The Local Government Center notified members during the week of June 19, 2013 that, "barring legal intervention," the organization plans to distribute funds in a manner that would specifically exclude Durham, Northfield, Peterborough, Salem, and numerous other political subdivisions across the state in similar situations, from their proportional share of the return of surplus. 

This is inherently unfair to the local taxpayers of Durham, Northfield, Peterborough, Salem, and numerous other political subdivisions across the state. 

The towns seek an equitable approach to distributing the surplus generally requiring the LGC to calculate the amount of surplus that accrued each year from the year that the LGC first unlawfully retained excess surplus, and to allocate the surplus proportionally amongst the members of the Trusts by year.

"Such an annual, proportional remedy calculation could be easily applied and would be equitable.  In short, it would be fair," according to Selig.  

--

 

LGC Case Background & Details on Coalition of Communities' Petition to NH Supreme Court

In the Order dated August 16, 2012, State of NH hearings officer Donald Mitchell found that the Local Government Center (LGC) had engaged in actions or inactions that resulted in multiple violations of RSA 5-B. 

These statutory violations, which commenced in 2003 and continued through 2010, were attributable to, amongst other things, a failure by LGC to distribute to Trust members on an annual basis excess earnings and surplus, improper transfers of monies from the Health Care Trust and Property Liability Trust to the Workers Compensation Trust, and a transfer of the Health Care Trust’s and Property Liability Trust’s respective interests in real estate to the Local Government Center Real Estate Inc. without consideration.

In sum, the Order found that but for these illegal actions, there would have been additional excess earning and surplus that would be available to return to LCG members on an annual basis – members such as Durham, Northfield, Peterborough, and Salem.

--

 

The Order: What The LGC Has To Pay Back

$33.2 million from HealthTrust

$17.1 million the Property-Liability pool siphoned from HealthTrust

$3.1 million from Property-Liability for communities that joined after June 14, 2010

Total: $53.4 million

 --

Subsequent to the filing with the BSR, the Bureau of Securities Regulation’s outside counsel, Andru Volinsky told Annmarie Timmins of the Concord Monitor, “The bureau will need to look at this…There is nothing in the law that says you have to be a member to get your surplus back.”

To date, the Towns have received no formal response from the BSR.

Friday
Jan182013

Coalition of NH Municipalities File Motion to Intervene on LGC Supreme Court Appeal

Towns of Durham, Northfield, Peterborough, and Salem NH

 

Coalition of Municipalities File Motion to Intervene with NH Supreme Court on Appeal of the Local Government Center, Inc. (LGC) CASE No. 2012-0729

Allege LGC Discriminatory Business Practices in Return of Ordered Surplus Funds

1/17/13

The Towns of Durham, Northfield, Peterborough, and Salem, NH, on behalf of a coalition of fourteen municipalities (Auburn, Bennington, Canaan, Durham, Greenfield, Henniker, Lyndeborough, Meredith, Northfield, Peterborough, Plainfield, Raymond, Salem and Temple), today have filed a motion to intervene in the Appeal of the Local Government Center, Inc. v. NH Bureau of Securities Regulation case presently before the NH Supreme Court. 

The action marks an unfortunate turn of events in which municipal taxpayer funds are now being diverted to litigate the very organization charged with representing the interests of towns and cities across NH, as well as the public agency charged with regulating it.

The Bureau of Securities Regulation (BSR) found wrongdoing in the management of the Local Government Center’s risk pools. It ordered millions of dollars held by the Local Government Center (LGC) to be returned to current members of the pools.

Durham Administrator Todd Selig states, “The BSR, however, did not distinguish among members. Some joined the risk pools early or late, some left early or late, and some joined, left, and later rejoined. By ordering the money returned to current members, it created windfalls for some, but inadequate recompense for others. That is, some members will receive an arbitrarily larger share than their contribution, and some an arbitrarily smaller share.”

To fix this, the four towns have petitioned the NH Supreme Court to allow them to intervene, and to address the hearings officer’s failure to fashion a remedy that will allow refunds in proportion to members’ contributions. Due to the dates they joined and left, these four – Durham, Northfield, Peterborough, and Salem – believe they represent all members whose share of the refund will be inadequate compared to the share of the money they contributed.

LGC Case Background & Details on Coalition of Communities' Petition to NH Supreme Court

In the Order dated August 16, 2012, State of NH hearings officer Donald Mitchell found that the Local Government Center (LGC) had engaged in actions or inactions that resulted in multiple violations of RSA 5-B. 

These statutory violations, which commenced in 2003 and continued through 2010, were attributable to, amongst other things, a failure by LGC to distribute to Trust members on an annual basis excess earnings and surplus, improper transfers of monies from the Health Care Trust and Property Liability Trust to the Workers Compensation Trust, and a transfer of the Health Care Trust’s and Property Liability Trust’s respective interests in real estate to the Local Government Center Real Estate Inc. without consideration.

Salem Town Manager Keith Hickey states, “In sum, the Order found that but for these illegal actions, there would have been additional excess earning and surplus that would be available to return to LCG members on an annual basis – members such as Durham, Northfield, Peterborough, and Salem.”

The Order: What The LGC Has To Pay Back

$33.2 million from HealthTrust

$17.1 million the Property-Liability pool siphoned from HealthTrust

$3.1 million from Property-Liability for communities that joined after June 14, 2010

Total: $53.4 million

 

As no agreement was presented to the hearings officer within 30 days of the Order as required, the LGC proposes to issue refunds to those who were members of its Health and Property Liability Trusts as of 8/16/12, the date of the Order. 

Durham, Northfield, Peterborough, and Salem contend that such a refund would not meet the standard articulated in the Order that refunds shall be “in proportion to each member’s contributions to that standing amount of earnings and surplus.” 

Durham Administrator Todd Selig states, “The return of tens of millions of dollars by the LGC to its members of the Health Trust and Property-Liability Trust programs is mandated by the hearing officer’s order to be in proportion to each member’s contributions.  Durham, Northfield, Peterborough, Salem and other political subdivisions contributed to the surplus with taxpayer funds.  Those funds should therefore be returned.  It is an issue of basic fairness and equity -- no more, no less.”

Durham, Peterborough, Salem and many other political subdivisions would have been able to recoup a refund had its operative date been June 14, 2010 – the date set by the Order if the BSR and LGC reached an agreement.

Northfield and many other political subdivisions who left the LGC prior to June 14, 2010 would have been able to recoup a refund had the remedy required a re-calculation of surplus on an annual basis, with the surplus distributed annually, based on annual membership rolls and the premiums paid by members and former members each year.

The NH Supreme Court has equity jurisdiction to fashion a refund remedy that is in proportion to each member’s contributions to that standing amount of earnings and surplus.

Durham, Northfield, Peterborough, and Salem and scores of other political subdivisions across NH contributed to the creation of the illegal LGC surplus, but per the terms of the Order and the position taken by the LGC, they are not eligible to participate in the distribution of surplus because they terminated their Trust membership prior to 8/16/12. 

Northfield Town Administrator Glenn Smith states, “The municipalities have requested the NH Supreme Court to determine an equitable approach to distributing the surplus generally requiring the LGC to calculate the amount of surplus that accrued each year from the year that the LGC first unlawfully retained excess surplus, and to allocate the surplus proportionally amongst the members of the Trusts by year.” 

“Such an annual, proportional remedy calculation could be applied and would be equitable,” states Town Manager Hickey.

Peterborough Town Administrator Pam Brenner states, “The information provided by the LGC in response to Durham, Peterborough, and Salem’s RSA 91-A request reveals that in any given year, the membership of the Trusts changed.  Awarding the refund based on the August 16, 2012 Order date does not capture accurately the amounts that Trust members contributed to the Trusts over the time that the surplus accrued.”

Selig states, “Public employees paid a significant portion of the health care premiums, and presumptively they will receive from their employers a corresponding portion of any health care surplus refund payment.  The existence of such public employee health care premium contributions underscores the importance of achieving an accurate and equitable distribution of any Trust surplus.  Only the NH Supreme Court can remedy the inherently inequitable situation at this juncture.”

Durham, Northfield, Peterborough, and Salem, as Intervenors, have requested of the NH Supreme Court that their Motion be granted, and that they be allowed to brief before the NH Supreme Court two issues:

1.  Whether the hearings officer erred in failing to fashion a remedy that will allow that refunds shall be in proportion to each member’s and former member’s contributions to that standing surplus amount and earnings?

2.  Whether the NH Supreme Court should exercise its equitable powers to fashion a remedy that the calculation and refund of any surplus shall be in proportion to each member’s or former member’s annual contribution to said illegal surplus, or such other equitable remedy as the Court shall see fit?

In December 2012, the towns of Auburn, Bennington, Canaan, Durham, Greenfield, Henniker, Lyndeborough, Meredith, Northfield, Peterborough, Plainfield, Raymond, Salem and Temple filed a formal complaint regarding LGC discriminatory business practices with the NH Bureau of Securities Regulation.

Subsequent to the filing with the BSR, the Bureau of Securities Regulation’s outside counsel, Andru Volinsky told Annmarie Timmins of the Concord Monitor, “The bureau will need to look at this…There is nothing in the law that says you have to be a member to get your surplus back.”

Town Administrator Pam Brenner states, “To date, the Towns have received no formal response from the BSR.”

The motion to intervene filed by Concord Appeals Attorney Joshua L. Gordon may be found on line at http://appealslawyer.net/do/briefs/Petition_to_Intervene_w_appx.pdf

Monday
Dec102012

Twelve Municipalities File Formal Complaint with NH Bureau of Securities Regulation Citing Discriminatory Local Government Center (LGC) Business Practices 

Towns of Durham and Peterborough, NH

PRESS RELEASES

Twelve Municipalities File Formal Complaint with NH Bureau of Securities Regulation Citing

Discriminatory Local Government Center (LGC) Business Practices

12/10/12

 

Dissatisfaction with the New Hampshire Local Government Center’s proposal to “refund” more than $52 million in surplus funds that the NH Bureau of Securities Regulations hearings officer has ordered to be returned to NH municipalities and school districts has prompted a dozen municipalities to file a formal complaint with the NH Bureau of Securities Regulation.

The towns of Peterborough and Durham, along with ten other municipalities (Auburn, Bennington, Canaan, Greenfield, Henniker, Lyndeborough, Northfield, Plainfield, Raymond and Temple), have written a December 7, 2012 letter to Director Glennon of the NH Bureau of Securities pointing out that the LGC’s proposed refund through the issuance of future insurance premium “holidays” to current LGC members will not include those municipalities and school districts that contributed to the creation of the surplus funds, but that have recently left the LGC and taken their insurance business elsewhere.

Peterborough Town Administrator Pam Brenner and Durham Administrator Todd Selig state that the letter to the Bureau of Securities Regulation calls attention to the discriminatory effect of the LGC’s proposed refund that fails to return cash to the former LGC members.  Ms. Brenner and Mr. Selig indicate that there are at least 20 NH municipalities and school districts that are in the same position as Peterborough and Durham: they were members of the LGC when the illegal surpluses were allowed to accumulate, but the reimbursement of a pro rata share of the surplus funds to these former LGC members is not being proposed by the LGC.  This is patently unfair to local taxpayers from these communities whose annual insurance premiums to the LGC were utilized to amass significant illegal reserves by the organization, one of the largest public risk pools in the nation.

The New Hampshire Secretary of State’s Office, through the Bureau of Securities Regulation, argued LGC practices were illegal.  They contended that the LGC was amassing money by overcharging cities, towns, and school districts for health insurance and not returning enough surplus to member communities. Hearing officer Donald Mitchell agreed.  In August 2012, he ordered the LGC to return more than $52 million to communities

The Order: What The LGC Has To Pay Back

$33.2 million from HealthTrust

$17.1 million the Property-Liability pool siphoned from HealthTrust

$3.1 million from Property-Liability for communities that joined after June 14, 2010

Total: $53.4 million

 

Selig, Brenner, and the other municipalities find the notion that communities, and more specifically local taxpayers, cannot receive a refund in cash and that entities have to be a continuing customer of the LGC organization to participate in the surplus refund to be an incredible and outrageous position.  It is patently unfair to local taxpayers.

The municipalities have called upon Director Glennon and the Bureau to investigate this discriminatory refund proposal.  Ms. Brenner and Mr. Selig state that it is common sense that since the LGC had an obligation to perform an audit and an actuarial analysis of the insurance programs, and then refund any surplus funds on an annual basis, the refund of funds should be calculated on an annual basis and credited to the members of these insurance program on an annual basis.  The refund process must both be fair and transparent.  Municipalities, school districts, and their employees were contributors to these insurance programs on an annual basis.  The premiums were calculated on an annual basis, and the contributions to pay for the premiums were made on an annual basis.  Each year, the identity of those municipalities and school districts that were members of the insurance programs changed. 

These municipalities believe that after all of the problems with LGC programs that have been identified by the BSR, is it asking too much to have a plan to refund the surplus to the taxpayers of members communities, by year of participation, in cash?  Is it asking too much to get the refund right so that taxpayers of communities that contributed to the illegal LGC surplus receive their fair share of the ordered refund?

Peterborough, Durham, and the other affected communities await a prompt response from the Bureau of Securities Regulation and the LGC on this important fairness issue.

Wednesday
Oct172012

RNC - Senators Ayotte and McCain Highlight Election’s Clear Choice at Townhalls in Peterborough and Raymond

Bedford, NH – FRIDAY, Senators Kelly Ayotte and John McCain will hold townhall events in Peterborough and Raymond to draw the clear contrast in this election between a future of prosperity and rising incomes under a President Romney, or a future of the status quo under President Obama who displayed at last night’s debate that he has no plan for a second term.

With more than $5.5 trillion in new debt under President Obama, $51,000 per Granite Stater the past four years, the choice is so clear on the very different visions for our future. When Mitt Romney is president, he will cut spending, restore our AAA credit rating, and set us on a path to a balanced budget.

The following events are open to the press:

Friday, October 19, 2012:

Event:                                   Peterborough Townhall

 

Location:                             Peterborough Town Hall

                                                1 Grove Street

                                                Peterborough, NH

                                                                                                                                           

Time:                                    10:00 AM

 

***

 

Event:                                   Raymond Townhall

 

Location:                             Raymond Safety Complex

                                                1 Scribner Road

                                                Raymond, NH

                                                                                                                                           

Time:                                    2:00 PM