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Entries in Poverty (26)

Monday
Sep282015

CEI Today: OPIC expiring, the world's poor, and China and global warming 

Monday, September 28, 2015
In the News Today

 

SHUT DOWN OPIC - RYAN YOUNG

 

The Case for Closing OPIC

OPIC’s charter expires on September 30, unless Congress renews it—in this way, its business model is similar to the now-expired Export Import Bank. From wasting taxpayer money on the politically well-connected to ineffective job creation policies, the report lists the many reasons why it's time to pull the plug on OPIC. > Read more

> Interview Ryan Young

 

THE WORLD'S POOR? - IAIN MURRAY


World Bank Increases Number of Poor
 

The World Bank is considering changing its definition of what constitutes extreme poverty, raising the level below which someone is treated as extremely poor from $1.25 a day to $1.90 a day. This comes after a long trend of people moving out of the category, leading some to point out that the Bank may have an interest in maintaining high numbers of people defined as poor. > Read more


> Interview Iain Murray
 

CHINA AND GLOBAL WARMING - MYRON EBELL

American and Chinese Presidents Agree To Continue To Work Together To Raise U. S. Energy Prices

 

Press reports have focused on the announcement that China will begin an emissions trading (or cap-and-trade) system for greenhouse gas emissions from electric generation and most industries by 2017.  But just as with the Obama-Xi deal last year, China does not commit to actual emissions reductions.  > Read more
 

 




Realclearradio.org

Bloomberg Boston
1pm & 7pm ET
Bloomberg San Francisco 10am & 4pm PT

 

    

 

CEI is a non-profit, non-partisan public policy group dedicated to the principles of free enterprise and limited government.  For more information about CEI, please visit our website, cei.org.  Follow CEI on Twitter! Twitter.com/ceidotorg.

 


Media Contacts: 202-331-2277
Annie Dwyer

Christine Hall
Mary Beth Gombita

Keara Vickers

CEI Issues:

Advancing Capitalism
Business & Gov't
Energy & Environment
Finance & Entrepreneurship
Health & Safety
Human Achievement Hour
Law & Constitution
Labor & Employment
Nanny State
Regulatory Reform
Risk & Consumer Freedom
Tech and Telecom
Trade and International
Transportation & Infrastructure

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Wednesday
Sep022015

CEI Today: NSA phone records, poverty & capitalism, labor ruling, streetcars, and more

Tuesday, September 1, 2015
In the News Today

 

POVERTY & CAPITALISM - IAIN MURRAY

 

World’s Poor: “We Want Capitalism”
 

Next month, the United Nations will formally announce the successors to its Millennium Development Goals, the global body’s approach to poverty alleviation since the year 2000. These new goals will be touted as “sustainable.” The event will coincide with a visit by the pope, at which he is expected to concentrate on climate change and materialism as the greatest threats to the welfare of the people of the developing world.
 
Don’t expect to hear much on the way people in the Western world lifted themselves out of poverty: free-market capitalism. > Read more
 

 

NSA'S COLLECTION OF PHONE RECORDS - RYAN RADIA

Court Upholds Legality of NSA's Bulk Collection of Telephone Records


Although the D.C. Circuit’s decision in Klayman has major implications for future cases about government surveillance, it won’t immediately affect the NSA’s bulk collection program.  > Read more

> Interview Ryan Radia

 

LABOR RULING UPENDS BUSINESSES, JOBS - IAIN MURRAY

NLRB's Joint-Employer Ruling: Payback for Unions at Workers' and Business' Expense

In a radical new ruling, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) late last week threw all American franchise and contract businesses into a state of uncertainty. In a 3-2 decision, the NLRB ruled that companies can now be held responsible for labor violations committed by franchisors and contractors. It’s hard to overstate the potential fallout from this decision. > Read more 

> Interview an expert

 

STREET CARS - MARC SCRIBNER


WSJ: Streetcars Suffer Bumpy Ride
 

“What Atlanta did was a huge mistake,” said Marc Scribner, a research fellow at the libertarian Competitive Enterprise Institute. The money, he said, could have been better spent by improving the city’s bus system. > Read the WSJ story 


> Interview Marc Scribner

 




Realclearradio.org

Bloomberg Boston
1pm & 7pm ET
Bloomberg San Francisco 10am & 4pm PT

 

    

 

CEI is a non-profit, non-partisan public policy group dedicated to the principles of free enterprise and limited government.  For more information about CEI, please visit our website, cei.org.  Follow CEI on Twitter! Twitter.com/ceidotorg.

 

The High Cost of
Big Labor


A set of three CEI studies examines the economic impact of labor policies on U.S. states, including right to work and collective bargaining laws.


Media Contacts: 202-331-2277
Annie Dwyer

Christine Hall
Mary Beth Gombita

Keara Vickers

CEI Issues:

Advancing Capitalism
Business & Gov't
Energy & Environment
Finance & Entrepreneurship
Health & Safety
Human Achievement Hour
Law & Constitution
Labor & Employment
Nanny State
Regulatory Reform
Risk & Consumer Freedom
Tech and Telecom
Trade and International
Transportation & Infrastructure

Sign Up for the Weekly Cooler Heads Digest!

A Friday afternoon e-newsletter on the latest energy and environment happenings. Sign up today!
 





 

Friday
Jul102015

PoorInDemocracy.org - New Book by NH Writer Exposes Gaping Holes in Voting and Representation 

50 Years After Voting Rights Act, New Book by NH Writer Exposes Gaping Holes in Voting and Representation

"Democracy in Poverty: A View from Below" Combines Empirical Analysis and Personal Encounters from Poverty-Line Research by Greyhound Bus

Cover

 

(Harvard ebook available on Amazon)

 

What is the connection between poverty and politics today? Does money determine a person’s political voice? Is poverty a democracy problem? To tackle these thorny questions, political reformer Daniel Weeks of Nashua, NH traveled 10,000 miles through thirty states by Greyhound bus, speaking with hundreds of fellow citizens living in poverty and recording his experiences on a poverty-line budget of $16 a day. From benches on Capitol Hill to the Lower Ninth Ward of New Orleans, from the desert colonias of New Mexico to Skid Row in L.A., his profiles and careful analysis put a human face on poverty and political inequality in the 21st century.

Building on the 2014 “Poor (in) Democracy” series for The Atlantic, this book explores the complex relationship between institutional poverty and political power, including how economic inequalities enter the political sphere and undermine political equality; how political arrangements deepen and entrench poverty; and what it means in real life to be poor and (seek to) participate in politics. Highlights from the research findings include:

  • 45 million Americans are currently living below the poverty line on less than $6,000 per person per year or $16 per day
  • Nearly half of all impoverished Americans subsist in deep poverty with annual incomes of less than one-half the federal poverty line – the highest point since recordkeeping began in 1975
  • Low-income people are less than half as likely to vote in most elections as their wealthy counterparts and face a wide range of practical barriers to exercising the franchise
  • Roughly 25 million adults of voting age are legally barred from voting or lack voting representation in Congress
  • The largest single campaign contributor in 2012 provided more money than 98% of Americans combined
  • Issues primarily relevant to lower income Americans account for 4% of legislation in Congress and command less than 1% of lobbying resources
  • Americans in the bottom half of the income distribution command less than 5% of political power across five core dimensions of democratic participation

The stories Weeks recounts in the words of “second-class citizens” across the United States challenge our cherished assumptions about the American dream. Consumed by the daily demands of subsistence and excluded from political participation by both formal and informal means, the people profiled are struggling to make their voices heard where it matters most: in politics. Their persistent poverty is a problem–a moral outrage, in fact–but it’s not the kind of problem we think. More than an economic or social concern, their poverty is political: it is embedded in the very structures of society and maintained by an unjust distribution of political power. To counteract systemic poverty and political inequality, Weeks proposes a slate of reforms aimed at strengthening American democracy, so that all citizens can make their voices heard.

Democracy in Poverty: A View from Below (2015) was published by the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University and is available on Amazon for the poverty-line price of $0.99Funding for the research was provided by the Center and by the Carsey School for Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire. Proceeds from sale of the book go to support Open Democracy, a nonpartisan organization working to close the influence gap in American politics.

To contact the author or schedule an interview, please write contact@poorindemocracy.me or call (202) 596-1706.

_____

About the Author

Raised in “poverty-lite” in the all-white town of Temple, New Hampshire, backed by generations of college degrees, Daniel Weeks did not encounter systemic poverty until leaving home to serve as an AmeriCorps volunteer with City Year Washington, DC at age 18. That experience, combined with a passion for democracy cultivated in high school by the legendary New Hampshire reformer Doris “Granny D” Haddock (1910-2010), set him on his path as an ardent proponent of democratic reform. As founding director of Students for Clean Elections in 2002, Weeks advocated successfully for comprehensive election reform, including the first legislature-approved public funding law in the country. From 2008-11, he served as president of Americans for Campaign Reform, working with a bipartisan team of former U.S. senators to advance citizen-funded elections in Congress. In 2011, he founded the Money and Politics Project for democratic reform in South Africa, before returning to continue the work in New Hampshire in 2013.

Today, Weeks serves as Executive Director of Open Democracy, a nonpartisan nonprofit working to ensure transparent and accountable governance. Open Democracy’s New Hampshire Rebellion campaign is walking the talk for democracy across the Granite State to build the reform movement — 30,000 miles and counting. Weeks has written and spoken on democracy issues for The Atlantic, New York Times, Boston Globe, Christian Science Monitor, and on PBS, NPR, BBC, and other outlets. For his Poor (in) Democracy project, Weeks traveled 10,000 miles through 30 states by Greyhound bus, conducting interviews and participant observations with dozens of people in poverty while maintaining a poverty-line budget of $16 per day. He was privileged to study Political Science at Yale and Political Theory at Oxford on a Marshall Scholarship. He lives in Nashua, NH with his wife, Dr. Sindiso Mnisi Weeks.

Thursday
Sep252014

NHGOP STATEMENT ON NEW HAMPSHIRE DEMOCRAT CALLING POOR GRANITE STATERS "BOTTOM FEEDERS"

 

 

Concord - New Hampshire Republican State Committee Chairman Jennifer Horn today released the following statement on Democrat John R. White's statement that economically-disadvantaged Granite Staters are bottom feeders:

 

"Mr. White should immediately apologize for his disturbing remarks, and the New Hampshire Democrats should denounce his statement immediately," said Horn. "It's bad enough that Mr. White is advocating policies that will kill New Hampshire jobs and do further damage to our already stagnant economy, but he adds insult to injury by degrading hard working families who are struggling to get by. We encourage all Republicans to work hard to re-elect Majority Leader Jeb Bradley so we can make sure that Mr. White and his unsavory language never represent the people of New Hampshire." 

 

In a letter to the editor published in a local newspaper, Mr. White wrote that the policies he is promoting "will put more jungle in the jeans of the bottom feeders in the economic pond and they will spend it.  That's what poor people do when they get money because they NEED things."

 

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Wednesday
Sep242014

ALG's Daily Grind - Are traffic cameras becoming public surveillance tools?

6

Sept. 23, 2014

Permission to republish original opeds and cartoons granted. 

Are traffic cameras becoming public surveillance tools?
Is Big Brother already watching? 

Cartoon: EPA Scales of Injustice

Did $3.5 trillion of Fed easing even work?
It is hard to find any discernible difference in mortgage markets before and after quantitative easing.

Daily Caller: Rush Limbaugh's call screener says 'What liberalism has done to black communities is horrific
James Golden: "What liberalism has done to black communities is horrific."

  

Sept. 23, 2014

Permission to republish original opeds and cartoons granted.

Are traffic cameras becoming public surveillance tools?
Is Big Brother already watching?

Cartoon: EPA Scales of Injustice

Did $3.5 trillion of Fed easing even work?
It is hard to find any discernible difference in mortgage markets before and after quantitative easing.

Daily Caller: Rush Limbaugh's call screener says 'What liberalism has done to black communities is horrific
James Golden: "What liberalism has done to black communities is horrific."