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Entries in Voter Fraud (64)

Wednesday
Jan152014

Watchdog.org - Voter fraud is real and we have proof 

Most in Congress are millionaires, but not because they’re getting rich off the system
 
For the first time in history, more than half of America’s elected representatives in Congress are worth more than $1 million.

According to the Center for Responsive Politics, which tracks political spending in Congress, at least 268 of the current 534 members of Congress had a net worth of at least $1 million in 2012.
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Taxpayers paid nearly $175M for penis pumps from 2006 to 2011
Taxpayers paid nearly $175 million for vacuum erection systems (VES), commonly known as “penis pumps,” from 2006 to 2011, according to an inspector general report released on Monday.
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Voter fraud: We’ve got proof it’s easy
Liberals who oppose efforts to prevent voter fraud claim that there is no fraud — or at least not any that involves voting in person at the polls. But New York City’s watchdog Department of Investigations has just provided the latest evidence of how easy it is to commit voter fraud that is almost undetectable.
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Saturday
Sep072013

NHDP Statement on NHGOP Voter Fraud Scandal 

Concord  - New Hampshire Democratic Party Communication Director Harrell Kirstein release the following statement on revelations that a family member of Republican Majority Leader Jeb Bradley voting twice in the same election while registered at his home.


"If the NHGOP is actually looking for voter fraud they should start the search their own Majority Leader's backyard. Mr. Bradley clearly voted twice during the 2008 election, once in Colorado and once in New Hampshire to help get his father back to Washington DC.  It is wrong for someone to vote twice in the same election, just as it is wrong for politicians to try to influence elections by discouraging voters that don’t agree with them.

"It is deeply concerning that someone so close to a Republican candidate and party leader would engage in this kind of unethical and illegal behavior and it raises seriously questions about who else was involved. Did Jeb Bradley aid in the illegal voting that occurred at his home? Was the Bradley for Congress campaign aware of anyone else committing similar actions?"
Friday
Sep062013

NHDP - ICYMI: Jeb Bradley's son voted twice in 2008 general election as a college student

Union Leader: Jeb Bradley's son voted twice in 2008 general election as a college student
[LINK: http://www.unionleader.com/article/20130905/NEWS06/130909603]
September 6, 2013

By JOHN DiSTASO
Senior Political Reporter
 
CONCORD -- Five years ago, when his father was running for the U.S. House, the son of current state Senate Majority Leader Jeb Bradley's voted in the 2008 general election in both New Hampshire and Colorado, according to voting officials and records in each state.
 
Sebastian Bradley, who is now in his late 20s, voted in person in Larimer County, Colorado, in the November 2008 general election, county election officials said, citing records. Bradley was student at Colorado State University at the time.
 
Separately, Wolfeboro town clerk Patricia Waterman confirmed the younger Bradley voted there by absentee ballot in the same election.
 
Republican Jeb Bradley was a candidate for the U.S. House in the 2008 election, losing for the second time to current Democratic Rep. Carol Shea-Porter. He had served in Congress from 2003 through 2006.
 
The elder Bradley said in an interview Thursday he did not know for sure whether his son actually voted twice.
 
But he said, "He was a college student at the time. He was attending Colorado State University and if he voted in two places, it was clearly a mistake, if that's what he did."
 
Bradley said he wanted to "get more details" before saying anything more.
 
He did say, however, that his son's voting was not a factor in his announcement earlier this week that he would not be a candidate for statewide office in 2014.
 
Jeb Bradley had been considering running for the U.S. Senate or for governor next year, but cited "two very sick family members" in his announcement and re-confirmed Thursday the illnesses are the sole reason for his decision.
 
Bradley said the emergence of his son's 2008 voting record was "purely coincidental."
 
A state law, RSA 659:34-a, prohibits voting in more than one state. Violation is a Class B felony punishable by three-and-a-half to seven years in prison. The statute of limitations for a felony is six years.
 
A federal law prohibits voting more than once in any federal election and says those found guilty will be fined a maximum of $10,000 "or imprisoned not more than five years, or both."
 
Election officials in Larimar County, Colo., said Sebastian Bradley registered to vote in Larimer County in 2006 and confirmed he voted early in Larimer County in the Nov. 4, 2008 general election. An official confirmed he voted on Oct. 30, 2008 at the Colorado State University student center.
 
He then registered to vote in Routt County, Colo., in 2011, an official said.
 
Wolfeboro Town Clerk Waterman said the 2008 general election was the only election in the past five years in which Sebastian Bradley cast a ballot in her and Jeb Bradley's town. She said it was an absentee ballot.
 
Waterman said the younger Bradley did not vote in Wolfeboro in the presidential or state primary elections in 2008 or in any elections in New Hampshire in 2010 or 2012.
 
Waterman said Bradley "is still a registered voter on our checklist."
 
Sebastian Bradley's 2008 questionable voting follows controversy earlier this summer over alleged voter fraud.
 
Republicans alleged that Democratic state Sen. Martha Fuller Clark and four Democratic campaign workers committed voter fraud in the 2008 and 2012 elections when Clark housed the workers at her home and they then cited her home as their domicile in registering to vote and voting in Portsmouth. The workers left the state shortly after the elections.
 
But the Attorney General's office found, after an investigation, that neither Clark nor the campaign workers had committed voter fraud.
 
"While working and living in New Hampshire, these individuals established a physical presence at (Clark's home) in Portsmouth, which continued for several months. There is no evidence to conclude they falsely claimed New Hampshire as their domicile at the time they registered to vote," Assistant Attorney General Steve LaBonte wrote last month.
 
Earlier in the summer, the New Hampshire Union Leader reported that Kendra Kurk Anderson, the adult daughter of state Rep. Neal Kurk, voted in Weare in 2008 and 2012 by absentee ballot while living in Hawaii.
 
Neal Kurk said his daughter has a New Hampshire's driver's license, considers Weare her domicile and did nothing wrong.
 
Also, the Union Leader reported that Molly Shaheen, the daughter of U.S. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, voted in Madbury last year but listed Los Angeles as her home on her business's web site and on her Facebook page. The younger Shaheen said she split her time between California and New Hampshire and considered Madbury her home when she voted.
 
And in 2011, Brendan O'Brien, the son of former New Hampshire House speaker William O'Brien allegedly had dual registration in Mont Vernon and in Maine in 2010, where he attended college. He voted only in Mont Vernon, however.
 
After an investigation, the Attorney General's Office dismissed a complaint due to lack of evidence.
Friday
Aug302013

NHDP - ICYMI - Portsmouth Herald: Horn should apologize to Fuller Clark 

Key Point: "In our view, state Sen. Martha Fuller Clark has been fully exonerated by the New Hampshire attorney general's office of any and all allegations of voter fraud, which were recklessly leveled by state GOP Chairwoman Jennifer Horn....Instead of doubling down on her unfounded accusations, Horn should apologize to Sen. Fuller Clark."


Portsmouth Herald Editorial: Horn should apologize to Fuller Clark

August 29, 2013
In our view, state Sen. Martha Fuller Clark has been fully exonerated by the New Hampshire attorney general's office of any and all allegations of voter fraud, which were recklessly leveled by state GOP Chairwoman Jennifer Horn.
 
In an Aug. 21 letter to Horn, Stephen G. LaBonte, an assistant attorney general, wrote: "Based on the factual findings of our investigation and our analysis of the applicable law, there is insufficient evidence to conclude that there has been any instance of voter fraud with regard to Senator Fuller Clark, Andrea Riccio, Ellen Whelan-West, Ryan Flynn and Bryan Griffith during the 2008 or 2012 election season."
 
We're not surprised by the attorney general's finding, because we had come to the same conclusion after a Herald reporter looked into the allegations when they were first leveled in July and very quickly found them to be without merit.
 
It's too bad Horn didn't do some fact-finding of her own before making these extremely serious allegations.
 
And it is ironic that Horn, who did so little investigation of her own, claims the attorney general "made no effort to look at any objective evidence." We have read the attorney general's report and it contains nothing but objective evidence.
 
Republicans have been trying hard for several years now to make the case that there is rampant voter fraud in New Hampshire requiring a tightening of voter ID laws. And New Hampshire now has a reasonable voter ID law that should soothe the paranoia of those who think they are losing elections due to fraud rather than their own poor performance and lack of ideas.
 
Wild accusations such as those tossed out by Horn, however, only damage the credibility of those calling for more stringent voter ID laws.
 
While we don't always agree with Sen. Fuller Clark, we have the deepest respect for her great contributions to our community and our state, and we resent the reckless allegations Horn made against her.
 
Instead of doubling down on her unfounded accusations, Horn should apologize to Sen. Fuller Clark.
Thursday
Aug012013

NHDP - ICYMI - Telegraph Editorial: Party flap hardly voter fraud case

Key Points: "Horn is just trying to score political points when she claims that the Democratic campaign workers "improperly influenced New Hampshire elections and canceled out the votes of actual Granite Staters.' Actually, it’s more likely that they canceled out the votes of Republican campaign workers who did pretty much the same thing. The state Democratic Party website notes that campaign workers for Republican presidential nominee Gov. Mitt Romney also voted in the last election, even though they had out-of-state mailing addresses...."

"But it shouldn’t be used to bootstrap passage of the sort of voter laws that Republicans across the country have sought to get passed – laws that impede the voting rights of minorities because Republicans see as more likely to vote for the other party.
 
"Because that’s how elections really get stolen."



Nashua Telegraph Editorial: Party flap hardly voter fraud case


To hear New Hampshire Republican Party Chair Jennifer Horn tell it, Democrats are trying to steal elections in the state.
 
Horn recently wrote state Attorney General Joe Foster, asking him to investigate media reports that state Sen. Martha Fuller Clark, D-Portsmouth, allowed four Democratic campaign workers to live at her house and use her address to register to vote in the 2012 elections. The Republican Party head accused Fuller Clark of creating “a sanctuary for voter fraud.“
 
Horn claims Fuller Clark, the vice chairman of the state’s Democratic Party, knew the workers were in the state only temporarily and would be leaving shortly after the election to assume political jobs in other states, which they did.
 
Fuller Clark told WMUR that she had “no idea” how long the political operatives intended to remain in the state. We don’t think Fuller Clark is a mind-reader, but we don’t buy that answer, either. We think it’s likely that she knew full well that most, if not all, of the workers would be leaving the state within weeks of the election. To ask voters to believe otherwise does them a disservice.
 
In letters she wrote about the matter to Fuller Clark and the attorney general, Horn called the voting “illegal” and “improper.”
 
Well, there is a difference.
 
Horn said Fuller Clark allowed the workers to “parachute” into New Hampshire and was complicit in what she called “illegal drive-through voting.”
 
Horn deserves credit for colorful imagery, perhaps, but not much else. The fact is, this sort of thing happens all the time, and there’s nothing illegal about it, though whether it should be is open to debate.
 
State election law allows someone to vote if they establish a “domicile” in the state before the election, but there’s no minimum residency requirement and University of New Hampshire law professor John Greabe told the Concord Monitor that “domicile” is an “inherently mushy and highly subjective standard.”
 
Horn is just trying to score political points when she claims that the Democratic campaign workers “improperly influenced New Hampshire elections and canceled out the votes of actual Granite Staters.”
 
Actually, it’s more likely that they canceled out the votes of Republican campaign workers who did pretty much the same thing. The state Democratic Party website notes that campaign workers for Republican presidential nominee Gov. Mitt Romney also voted in the last election, even though they had out-of-state mailing addresses.
 
Horn also asked Fuller Clark to remove the names of the workers from the Portsmouth voter rolls. “If you fail to take action the New Hampshire Republican State Committee is prepared to take any appropriate action under the law including bringing it to the attention of the Superior Court.”
 
As if the state’s court system doesn’t have enough of a backlog without being further clogged up with lawsuits based on actions practiced, if not condoned, by both political parties.
 
This is a classic case of political grandstanding and a matter best left to the Legislature. If state lawmakers think they can craft something that narrowly addresses the issues raised by these claims and counterclaims, they should have at it.
 
But it shouldn’t be used to bootstrap passage of the sort of voter laws that Republicans across the country have sought to get passed – laws that impede the voting rights of minorities because Republicans see as more likely to vote for the other party.
 
Because that’s how elections really get stolen.